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  •  LaGuardia Community College Student Gets Award from New York State Mathematics Association of Two-Year Colleges

    LaGuardia Community College Student Gets Award from New York State Mathematics Association of Two-Year Colleges


    Alzahra


    Long Island City,NY—April 13, 2015—LaGuardia Community College student and Math Society member, Alzahra Ahmed, has received an $800 scholarship from the New York State Mathematics Association of Two-Year Colleges (NYSMATYC) Scholarship Committee.


    Alzahra wants to become an aerospace engineer and at LaGuardia is studying mechanical engineering. She is expected to graduate in Fall, 2015.


    Libyan born, Alzahra moved to Sudan when she was six years old.


    In 2012, her parents immigrated to the United States seeking economic opportunities and a better life for their six children. “Education always has been a priority for my parents,” said Alzahra.  "They felt this country would give us an educational opportunity and more chances to succeed in life.”


    She entered LaGuardia in Fall 2013, originally to pursue a pharmaceutical degree but after taking math and engineering classes, and encouraged by her professors Xin Gao and Tao Chen, Alzara realized that she has a passion for engineering.


    “Engineering is a very creative field,” she said. “If you know the concept you can start to innovate and your imagination becomes a reality. So I changed my major.”


    “There are two things which are equally important for success: talent and hard work.  Alzahra is one of the students who has both. I am very proud of her and what she has achieved so far,” said Xin Gao, an Assistant Professor in LaGuardia’s Natural Sciences Department.


     In her spare time, Alzahra works as a math tutor at the Students Government Association Hall and College’s Academic Peer Instruction (API) programs. Both programs provide tutoring help for students.


     “I feel good when I am helping other students and sharing my knowledge,” said Alzahra. “I hope this country can provide a stronger math foundation in elementary, middle and high-schools education to better prepare youth for college.”

     

    •     •     •     •


     LaGuardia Community College located in Long Island City, Queens, was founded in 1971 as a bold experiment in opening the doors of higher education to all, and we proudly carry forward that legacy today. LaGuardia educates students through over 50 degree, certificate and continuing education programs, providing an inspiring place for students to achieve their dreams. Upon graduation, LaGuardia students’ lives are transformed as family income increases 17%, and students transfer to four-year colleges at three times the national average. Part of the City University of New York (CUNY), LaGuardia is a nationally recognized leader among community colleges for boundary-breaking success educating underserved students. At LaGuardia we imagine new ideas, create new curriculum and pioneer programs to make our community and our country stronger. Visit www.laguardia.edu to learn more.

     

     LaGuardia Community College President Dr. Gail O. Mellow Appointed to Prestigious Education Finance Commission

    LaGuardia Community College President Dr. Gail O. Mellow Appointed to Prestigious Education Finance Commission


    Long Island City, NY— April 3, 2015—LaGuardia Community College President Dr. Gail O. Mellow will join two former state governors and other luminaries on a commission charged with finding new funding options for higher education.


    Convened by the University of Virginia’s Miller Center, the non-partisan National Commission on Financing 21st Century Higher Education held its first meeting last month in Washington, DC.

     

    According to a Miller Center press release, the 14-member group will “initiate blue-sky thinking to develop policy proposals aimed at providing long-term sustainable finance models for U.S. higher education” and conduct non-partisan research and analyses which “explore how public and private dollars can clear the way for innovation, ensure fair educational outcomes for all students, and affordably educate enough people to reach attainment goals.”

     

    "We need to invest in higher education to ensure our nation's economic growth, strengthen the middle class and maintain a vibrant democracy,” Mellow said. “But teaching and learning doesn't come cheap.  We need to create a long-term, stable way of financing higher education that looks creatively at new ways of supporting students and our nation's colleges. I look forward to working with my colleagues to think big and dig deep to recommend smart and bold ways of financing higher education in the 21st Century."

     

    With support from the Lumina Foundation, the commission will rely on outside authors to write policy papers that will provide a foundation for the panel’s ultimate report of findings, conclusions and recommendations. The panel will emphasize potential finance models that are suited to the fiscal climate and can accelerate growth in attainment among students from all backgrounds.


    Former Delaware Governor and U.S. Congressman Mike Castle and former Florida Governor and U.S. Senator Bob Graham will co-chair the group.


    Other members include: Andrea Ayers, President and CEO of Convergys, Jorge Benitez, Retired CEO, United States and Senior Managing Director, North America for Accenture, Carl Camden, President and CEO of Kelly Services, Inc., Juliet V. García, Executive Director of The University of Texas Americas Institute, formerly President of the University of Texas at Brownsville, Mildred García, President of California State University, Fullerton, Bernadette Gray-Little, Chancellor of the University of Kansas, Indiana State Sen. Luke Kenley, Chairman, Appropriations Committee, Maryland State Sen. Richard S. Madaleno Jr., Vice-Chair, Budget and Tax Committee, David Nelms, Chairman and CEO of Discover Financial, Edward B. Rust Jr., Chairman and CEO of State Farm Insurance Companies, and Michigan State University President Lou Anna K. Simon.


    “Thomas Jefferson — the first American president to found a university — felt that individuals ‘endowed with genius and virtue’ should receive an education ‘without regard for wealth, birth, or other accidental condition or circumstance,’” said William Antholis, director and CEO of the Miller Center. “Jefferson’s mission has come to a major obstacle. State support for public higher ed and federal support for student aid both face real limits, so many deserving students are finding it harder to pursue their own educational journeys without running out of financial resources. The commission aims to do something about that.”


    Lumina Foundation is an independent, private foundation committed to increasing the proportion of Americans with high-quality degrees, certificates and other credentials to 60 percent by 2025. Lumina’s outcomes-based approach focuses on helping to design and build an accessible, responsive and accountable higher education system while fostering a national sense of urgency for action to achieve Goal 2025.


    The Miller Center is a nonpartisan institute that seeks to expand understanding of the presidency, policy, and political history, providing critical insights for the nation’s governance challenges.


    •     •     •     •                                                                           


    LaGuardia Community College located in Long Island City, Queens, was founded in 1971 as a bold experiment in opening the doors of higher education to all, and we proudly carry forward that legacy today. LaGuardia educates students through over 50 degree, certificate and continuing education programs, providing an inspiring place for students to achieve their dreams. Upon graduation, LaGuardia students’ lives are transformed as family income increases 17%, and students transfer to four-year colleges at three times the national average. Part of the City University of New York (CUNY), LaGuardia is a nationally recognized leader among community colleges for boundary-breaking success educating underserved students. At LaGuardia we imagine new ideas, create new curriculum and pioneer programs to make our community and our country stronger. Visit www.laguardia.edu to learn more.

     Hit Television Series “Fresh Off the Boat” Holds Live Screening at LaGuardia Community College

    Hit Television Series “Fresh Off the Boat” Holds Live Screening at LaGuardia Community College


    Fresh Off the Boat photo


    Long Island City, NY—April 3, 2015—“Fresh Off the Boat” brought laughs, a budding television star, and serious discussion to LaGuardia Community College.”


    More than 100 students, staff and guests packed LaGuardia’s E building atrium to watch a live screening of the break-out ABC hit about an Asian-American family in Orlando, Fla.

     

    LaGuardia Associate Professor and Instructional Technology Librarian Ann Matsuuchi organized the viewing and a four-member panel to discuss social issues around the show as part of the College's Asian Heritage Celebration events series.

     

    Panel members included Wall Street Journal columnist Jeff Yang, whose son, actor Hudson Yang, plays the son, Eddie Huang, on the show; journalist, MSNBC Producer and CUNY Writers’ Institute Fellow Kai Ma; Mynette Louie, president of Gamechanger films, the first for-profit film fund dedicated exclusively to financing narrative features directed by women; and LaGuardia Assistant Professor of English Stafford Gregoire.

     

    Hudson Yang sat quietly in the audience during the screening but did not address the crowd.

     

    The throng watched “Licensed to Sell,” the ninth episode of the 13 episode series, and laughed appreciatively throughout.  

     

    “The show is really good,” said Anileydi Cantillo, a first year LaGuardia student who attended with several class members. “I never saw it before, but I have a cousin who told me it is very funny.”

     

    Queens resident Ken Huang, a computer repairman and fan of the show, said he came to LaGuardia to enjoy seeing it “in a social setting.”

     

    “It’s a very interesting show,” he said. “There are some parts I can relate to and some parts I don’t.”

     

    The audience stayed glued as to their seats when the show ended as the panel discussed a range of issues surrounding the program. Yang has organized several viewing parties around the show, including one in Times Square that was attended by 1,000 people.

     

    “What is so wonderful is how we can watch the show and relate so closely and identify so closely with it,” said Ma. “”I think this episode was a good lesson for young people, and a good lesson for young people of color, to just be who you are.”

     

    Gregoire was impressed at how the show “uses the tropes and stereotypes of American television families – the eccentric father, the dragon mom. I love this episode where the mom fails, which is a good send up of the Asian dragon mom image.”

     

    Louie said she was impressed with the many inside jokes that resonate with immigrants but might go over other people’s heads.

     

    Yang agreed. “They are taking things you might expect, taking characteristics we know and love and joke about as Asian Americans that when other people say them about us we’re not laughing as much,” he said. “But it feels kind of lived in, like it is coming from an authentic place, even though this is a sitcom.”

     

    In an interview after the show Yang said he had an offer to stage the viewing at the Museum of the Moving Image but instead brought it to LaGuardia because “I’m a huge believer in commuter colleges because there are so many people who are served by community colleges who don’t have the access to connect to a cultural experience like this. It’s called a community college, but it’s tougher to establish that community. It’s more important to bring the community to the community college.

     

    “Every experience I have had at LaGuardia has been really positive,” Yang said. “Everyone is engaged and listening and active.”

     

    Jeff Yang visited LaGuardia in 2011, at Matsuuchi’s invitation, to take part on a panel about Asian Americans and comic books.

     

    Matsuuchi said feedback from members of the LaGuardia community “before, during and after the event has assured me that this was a good idea. Several people have told me that this show's success gives us hope and confidence that American media will become more diverse in what it depicts, and attempt to promote the necessary conversations about race and class that need to be held in order for us to move forward.”

     

    Look out for another LaGuardia screening next season!


    • • • •

     

    LaGuardia Community College located in Long Island City, Queens, was founded in 1971 as a bold experiment in opening the doors of higher education to all, and we proudly carry forward that legacy today. LaGuardia educates students through over 50 degree, certificate and continuing education programs, providing an inspiring place for students to achieve their dreams. Upon graduation, LaGuardia students’ lives are transformed as family income increases 17%, and students transfer to four-year colleges at three times the national average. Part of the City University of New York (CUNY), LaGuardia is a nationally recognized leader among community colleges for boundary-breaking success educating underserved students. At LaGuardia we imagine new ideas, create new curriculum and pioneer programs to make our community and our country stronger. Visit www.laguardia.edu to learn more.

     Journalist Alice Su Delivers First Pulitzer Center—LaGuardia Community College Partnership Lecture

    Journalist Alice Su Delivers First Pulitzer Center—LaGuardia Community College Partnership Lecture


    Journalist Alice Su


    Long Island City, NY—March 25, 2015—Journalist Alice Su brought the plight of refugees displaced by armed conflicts in the Middle East and Africa to LaGuardia Community College.


    Based in Amman, Jordan, Su, the inaugural lecturer of the Pulitzer Center – LaGuardia Community College Campus Consortium Partnership, put a human face on the staggering numbers of people who have resettled in Jordan after fleeing conflicts in Syria, Iraq, Sudan, Somalia, and other countries in the region.


    “One out of four people you meet in Lebanon is a Syrian refugee,” Su told a rapt audience in LaGuardia’s Little Theater. “That is as if the entire population of Canada moved into the United States.”


    “LaGuardia is thrilled with our emerging partnership with the Pulitzer Center, which will afford our students access to journalists like Alice Su who are doing essential work in shedding light on what are too often hidden and painfully disturbing issues,” LaGuardia President Dr. Gail O. Mellow said in welcoming Su and Pulitzer Center Executive Director Jon Sawyer.  “Our college benefits richly from this collaboration and the opportunities it will provide to our faculty and staff.”


    The Pulitzer Center Campus Consortium includes more than 20 colleges and universities. The partnership incorporates professional journalists' visits to campus and international reporting opportunities for students.


    It is part of the Pulitzer Center on Crisis Reporting, which, according it the group’s website, focuses on “under-reported topics, promoting high-quality international reporting and creating platforms that reach broad and diverse audiences.”


    Sawyer said the Pulitzer Center believes quality journalism will increase public engagement on world events which affect us all.


    “Our connections are more direct than most of us think,” he said.


    Su noted in her lecture that while the sprawling camps offer safety and security, the refugees still face hardships compared to the lives they left behind, Su said. Most camps have no electricity, water is rationed, and schools lack books and other supplies.


    Refugees cannot legally work in Jordan, where Su is based, so have no way of improving their conditions. Those who do find work take the worse jobs.


    Jordanians are impacted as well, with schools and hospitals hard pressed to handle the overflow crowds. Rents have risen for even the worse housing – Su showed a picture of a woman living in a former garage and of thirty men who shared the same two room apartment.


    Su was joined by Jehangir Khattak, Senior Editor and Communications Director at Voicesofny.org, Graduate School of Journalism, City University of New York, who said he had seen similar camps in Pakistan decades ago.


    “Refugees place huge pressure on the country’s infrastructure,” Khattak said, noting that many brought illegal weapons and drugs into the camps.


    Su said some women are being forced into prostitution to help their families survive. The awful conditions have even enticed some refuges to join insurgent groups simple for the high salaries.


    Yet “when you talk to people they are really suffering but they don’t see themselves as victims,” Su said. “What they want most is not pity but support. We need new ways to provide asylum and new ways to help refugees provide for themselves.”


    Su's Pulitzer Center-reporting project “Interim Lives: Refugee Survival in Jordan and Lebanon” examines how refugee businessmen, lawyers, mothers, students and artists remake their lives in the camps.


    •     •     •     •                                                                     


    LaGuardia Community College located in Long Island City, Queens, was founded in 1971 as a bold experiment in opening the doors of higher education to all, and we proudly carry forward that legacy today. LaGuardia educates students through over 50 degree, certificate and continuing education programs, providing an inspiring place for students to achieve their dreams. Upon graduation, LaGuardia students’ lives are transformed as family income increases 17%, and students transfer to four-year colleges at three times the national average. Part of the City University of New York (CUNY), LaGuardia is a nationally recognized leader among community colleges for boundary-breaking success educating underserved students. At LaGuardia we imagine new ideas, create new curriculum and pioneer programs to make our community and our country stronger. Visit www.laguardia.edu to learn more.                                                                    


    The Pulitzer Center promotes in-depth engagement with global affairs through the sponsorship of quality international journalism across all media platforms and an innovative program of outreach and education. In 2014 the Pulitzer Center supported journalists working on more than 80 reporting projects worldwide. The Center partners with major newspapers, magazines and broadcast outlets as well as universities and high schools in the U.S. and Europe to broaden each project’s reach. The Campus Consortium initiative is a core component of the Center’s effort to create awareness campaigns around global systemic issues that affect us all. Based in Washington, DC, the Center is a non-profit organization that has won an Emmy for new approaches to news and documentary, Asia Society's Goldman Sachs Foundation Prize for best use of technology in international education, and best online journalism prizes from the National Press Foundation, Society of Professional Journalists, and National Press Club. http://pulitzercenter.org

     Falchi Building to Host LaGuardia Community College Student Photo Exhibit

    Falchi Building to Host LaGuardia Community College Student Photo Exhibit  


    Long Island City, NY—March 24, 2015—LaGuardia Community College and its neighbor, the Falchi Building, are planning a fond tribute to the community they both call home.

    “Long Island City: Past. Present. Future.”, is a photography exhibit of more than 40 images of the once industrial, and now rapidly, changing western Queens neighborhood taken by LaGuardia students which will debut March 26 in the Falchi Building lobby.

    “LaGuardia Photography Program students and alumni train their gaze at Long Island City, the industrial, glass condo'ed,  Citicorp'ed,  Superfund'ed, retro-historical niche of New York City,” said LaGuardia Photography Department Director Scott Sternbach.  “Today we are witnessing the second coming of this great Metropolis”.

    “In this exhibit our students will present a practiced yet youthful view of the transformation of Long Island City,” he said.

    The exhibit includes over forty photographs of a variety of topics in almost as many styles and techniques, including collages, panoramas, abstract, street-documentary, topographic and time-lapse images.
     
    “Like LaGuardia and our neighbor, the Falchi Building, Long Island City continues to grow and evolve,” said LaGuardia President Dr. Gail O. Mellow. “We are thrilled that the Falchi Building and Jamestown is partnering with the college to host this beautiful and powerful photographic look at the community we both call home.” 

    “Jamestown’s partnership with LaGuardia Community College allows us to support local artists while providing a venue for the students to display their work,” said Michael Phillips, president of Jamestown. “At the Falchi Building, Jamestown remains dedicated to supporting the Long Island City arts community and is committed to the neighborhood’s continued growth.”

    More than 25 students took them over the last year from “the top two-year photo program east of the Mississippi,” said Sternbach.

    "Long Island City was the first place where I really wanted to go and photograph,” said student photographer Enrique Rosas, whose work is in the Falchi show. “It is a place that inspires me constantly. I am happy to be able to share a little of this wonderful place through this project."

    "The people are the blood and veins of Long Island City; the rest is the atmosphere, the soul,” said exhibit contributor and former Long Island City resident Machi Versano. “I know the place like the back of my hand. I realized that after living there for years and exploring every nook in it, I can really deliver a different, not obvious perspective of the place.”

    Built in 1922 as a warehouse for the famed Gimbels department store, the Falchi Building, located at 31-00 47th Ave, is a five story, mixed use office building in the heart of Long Island City and across the street from LaGuardia Community College.

    “Long Island City: Past. Present. Future” opening Thursday, March 26 with a 5 p.m. reception. 



    •     •     •     •


    About LaGuardia Community College
    LaGuardia Community College located in Long Island City, Queens, was founded in 1971 as a bold experiment in opening the doors of higher education to all, and we proudly carry forward that legacy today. LaGuardia educates students through over 50 degree, certificate and continuing education programs, providing an inspiring place for students to achieve their dreams. Upon graduation, LaGuardia students’ lives are transformed as family income increases 17%, and students transfer to four-year colleges at three times the national average. Part of the City University of New York (CUNY), LaGuardia is a nationally recognized leader among community colleges for boundary-breaking success educating underserved students. At LaGuardia we imagine new ideas, create new curriculum and pioneer programs to make our community and our country stronger. Visit www.laguardia.edu to learn more.

    About Jamestown
    Jamestown was established in 1983 as an investment and management company focused on income-producing real estate in the United States.  Over the last 32 years, Jamestown has expanded into a national, vertically integrated real estate operator with approximately $7.6 billion of assets under management. Jamestown’s capabilities include: acquisitions, capital markets, property management, asset management, retail leasing, design, sustainability and risk management.  Jamestown employs more than 230 professionals in the United States, with headquarters in Atlanta, GA, and New York, NY and additional offices in Washington, DC, Boston, MA and San Francisco, CA. For more information, visit www.jamestownlp.com.



     Colorado College Officials Visit LaGuardia to Examine Educational Initiatives(1)

    Colorado College Officials Visit LaGuardia to Examine Educational Initiatives


    Colorado College Officials


    Long Island City, NY— March 23, 2015 – A delegation from Colorado’s Front Range Community College visited LaGuardia Community College last week to learn more about LaGuardia’s ground breaking student advisement and retention initiatives.

    Front Range Dean of Instruction Cathy Pellish, Faculty and Instructional Coach Heidi Strang, and Coordinator of Student Activities Nate Wiley spent an afternoon meeting with LaGuardia administrators and faculty members who briefed the group on several programs.

    Associate Dean for Academic Affairs Bret Eynon welcomed the group before giving a presentation on Project Completa, an initiative funded by a “First in World” grant.

    “Happily, we got the money to do what we were already doing,” Eynon said. “It was perfect. We don’t do any of these things for a few students; we do all of these things for all students.”

    Project Completa allows for more closely supervised academic and social counseling for students before they start college, while in college, and after graduating from LaGuardia as a means of increasing student retention and transition to careers or to four year colleges.

    Professors Andrea Francis and Raj Bhika outlined the discipline based, credit bearing first year seminars for incoming students, while Michael Rifino explained the Student Success Mentors program.

    Assistant Dean for Student Affairs Dr. T. Porter Brannon and Assistant Dean for Academic Affairs Dr. Howard Wach tackled the Integrated Advising initiative.

    English Professor Demetrios Kapetanakos and Dr. Bernard Polnariev, Administrative Officer of Academic Affairs gave an overview of LaGuardia’s ePortfolio system.

    Polnariev said there “was a college-wide conversation about the competencies we want our students to achieve, what we want them to know when they graduate. AS we worked through that, the task force was really comprised of Student Affairs and Academic Affairs, working collaboratively to think about what are essential for our students to know and what are the platforms on which they need to be able to demonstrate this knowledge.”

    Front Range Dean Pellish said the group made the trip to New York after their president “charges faculty, staff and administrators to really look at best practices and national innovations that are really attacking retention and completion rates.

    “We spent a semester reading, reading,” Pellish said. “What brought us to LaGuardia was when we looked at the Aspen Prize, CUNY names kept coming up, and that caught our attention.”

    Three CUNY colleges, LaGuardia, Hostos and Kingsborough, were Aspen Prize winners last year for in part for “strong outcomes” of student success in persistence, completion, and transfer; consistent improvement in outcomes over time and equity in outcomes for students of all racial/ethnic and socioeconomic backgrounds.

    According to their website, Front Range has four campuses and 30,460 students. Students come from 50 states and 50 foreign countries, and the average student is 26 years old.

    The Front Range group visited LaGuardia, Hostos, Guttman, Borough of Manhattan, and Kingsborough community colleges and the CUNY main offices.

    “The presentation today resonates with the theme of excellent what I’ll call onboarding of students,” Pellish said. “When Bret walked through the history of how all this came to be, I felt like he was reciting our history. Then I knew that LaGuardia is just a couple of years ahead of us, which gives me a lot of hope.”

    ####

    LaGuardia Community College located in Long Island City, Queens, was founded in 1971 as a bold experiment in opening the doors of higher education to all, and we proudly carry forward that legacytoday. LaGuardia educates students through over 50 degree, certificate and continuing education programs, providing an inspiring place for students to achieve their dreams. Upon graduation, LaGuardia students’ lives are transformed as family income increases 17%, and students transfer to four-yearcolleges at three times the national average. Part of the City University of New York (CUNY), LaGuardia is a nationally recognized leader among community colleges for boundary-breaking success educating underserved students. At LaGuardia we imagine new ideas, create new curriculum and pioneer programs tomake our community and our country stronger. Visit www.laguardia.edu to learn more.
     President Dr. Gail O. Mellow Testifies Before Congressional Committee

    LaGuardia Community College President Dr. Gail O. Mellow Testifies Before Congressional Committee

    pres.Mellow - testifies


    Long Island City, NY- March 20, 2015 - LaGuardia Community College President Dr. Gail O. Mellow testified  before a Congressional committee this week, where she touted several LaGuardia training programs and educational initiatives and urged lawmakers to find more money for the nation’s community colleges.

    “When you look at who community college students are, these are the individuals who want to make it in America,” Mellow said. “They believe in the American dream and are doing everything they can to get there.”

    Dr. Mellow testified before the Subcommittee on Labor, Health and Human Services, Education and Related Agencies of the House Appropriations Committee, chaired by Rep. Tom Cole (R-Okla.).

    Mellow gave an overview of LaGuardia’s 50,000 students – more than half are 25 years old or older, the majority female and 68 percent work more than 20 hours a week. Many, she said, are unfamiliar with a professional work environment.

     “They never met a person who went to work in a suit,” Mellow said of many LaGuardia students. “They never met a professional person much less worked in a professional area.”
    LaGuardia has to be “relentlessly pragmatic” in educating and training these students, she said, so they receive “really necessary, technical and near term skills” that will allow them to immediately enter the workforce while also making sure they receive skills that will pay long term rewards.

    Mellow outlined several ways LaGuardia is improving student outcomes, including more teacher training and collaborations with businesses to offer contextualized instruction to fit employer needs.

    “Investing in helping faculty teach better is essential,” Mellow said. “They are facing students unlike any we have ever seen before. If we could get faculty to help just two more students pass their class in every class, we would raise graduation rates by seven percent without any additional dollars.”

    An MDRC study of LaGuardia’s Bridge to College and Careers Program showed that “with a well-trained faculty we could make a huge difference - double the graduation rate and triple the number of students who went to college,” Mellow said.

    And a contextualized 17-week training project with front office staff at Weill-Cornell Medical Center produced employees who were not only eligible for tuition reimbursement but who also stayed in the job longer than candidates with bachelor’s degrees.

    Mellow also touted the intensive advising involved in CUNY’s Accelerated Study in Associates Program (ASAP), which President Obama has heralded for increasing student retention and graduation rates.

    With ASAP, “we found we could double the number of students who graduate in half the time,” Mellow said. “The challenge is, it’s an expensive program. We find in ASAP we need an additional $4,000 per student per year. It is not cheap.

    “But to get that student through in three years means they then begin a lifetime of earning,” she said.

    Mellow said educators, businesses and government should collaborate on a system that would allow economically disadvantaged community college students to accept unpaid internships in the corporate world. 

    Students, she said, “then can understand what the job is really like. And companies get to see these students, who are not from Princeton or Yale or Harvard but boy, are they going to make a difference in the American economy.

    “The way to think of community colleges is to really understand that this is a different group of individuals who really want to make a difference and who don’t need a lot,” she said. “They need a little bit of a helping hand. And then the results are extraordinary."

    "LaGuardia Community College, under the outstanding leadership of its President Gail Mellow, does a remarkable job of educating an incredibly diverse student population,” said Rep Carolyn B. Maloney. 

    “More than just a leg up, LaGuardia Community College offers a path to a whole host of career opportunities.  They are literally changing lives and making it possible for employers to find candidates with the job skills they are seeking. They are providing exactly the type of education President Obama was thinking about when he suggested funding two years of community college."

    “Community Colleges like LaGuardia are fundamental to our goal of closing the opportunity gap that exists for our low income communities,” said Rep. Joe Crowley (D-Queens, the Bronx).

     “Through innovative training programs, LaGuardia Community College equips countless New Yorkers with the skills necessary to enter the workforce as soon as possible and in high-demand job sectors. At a time when rising tuition costs are discouraging students from pursuing higher education, it is more critical than ever to invest in these institutions and ensure our students are able to maximize their education, forge a path of upward mobility and contribute to the growth of our economy.”

    Also testifying at the hearing were Aaron Thompson, Executive Vice President and Chief Academic Officer, Kentucky Council on Postsecondary Education; Benjamin L. Castleman, Assistant Professor of Education and Public Policy at the University of Virginia; Carol L. Fischer, Ph.D., Post-Doctoral Fellow, The University of Iowa, and Brian K. Fitzgerald, Ed.D., Chief Executive Officer, The Business-Higher Education Forum.


    •     •     •     •


    LaGuardia Community College located in Long Island City, Queens, was founded in 1971 as a bold experiment in opening the doors of higher education to all, and we proudly carry forward that legacy today. LaGuardia educates students through over 50 degree, certificate and continuing education programs, providing an inspiring place for students to achieve their dreams. Upon graduation, LaGuardia students’ lives are transformed as family income increases 17%, and students transfer to four-year colleges at three times the national average. Part of the City University of New York (CUNY), LaGuardia is  a nationally recognized leader among community colleges for boundary-breaking success education underserved students. At LaGuardia we imagine new ideas, create new curriculum and pioneer programs to make our community and our country stronger. Visit   www.laguardia.edu to learn more.

     LAGCC Shares Groundbreaking Adult Education Approaches through New Professional Development Institute

    LaGuardia Community College Shares Groundbreaking Adult Education Approaches through New Professional Development Institute


    Long Island City, NY—November 21, 2014—LaGuardia Community College has officially launched the College and Career Pathways Institute (CCPI) to provide professional development that helps educators prepare adults and out-of-school youth to get back on track to college and new careers through innovative contextualized and integrated instructional strategies.


    CCPI offers a campus-based demonstration site that pilots leading-edge curricula and program models and provides customized hands-on and web-based workshops, educational tools, faculty coaching and a well-tested curriculum design. CCPI trainers, all teachers with extensive and proven success in college preparatory classrooms, work with adult education programs, colleges, community based organizations, workforce training organizations, and college access and success organizations across the country. The Institute has already provided services in 11 states and has presented at many national conferences, including the Council on Adult Basic Education (COABE) Conference and the National College Transition Network Effective Transitions Conference in 2014.  


    “The pioneering work of the College and Career Pathways Institute is providing the highest quality training to a whole new generation of adult educators,” said Gail O. Mellow, President of LaGuardia. “With this training, thousands of educators will more effectively teach adult students, giving them the education and understanding about their chosen career that will allow them to build a better future for themselves and their families.”


    CCPI creates workshops and training materials using curriculum and program materials from LaGuardia’s Bridge to College and Careers Program and New York Basic Education and Skills Training (NYBEST) programs.  


    The Bridge to College and Careers Program prepares students to earn their High School Equivalency (HSE) diploma and successfully transition to college or career training. A recent random assignment evaluation of the Bridge Program found that students were twice as likely to complete the program, three times as likely to earn a HSE diploma, and twice as likely to transition to postsecondary education as their counterparts in a traditional HSE preparatory program ( http://www.mdrc.org/publication/enhancing-ged-instruction-prepare-students-college-and-careers). CCPI trainers have shared the Bridge Program model and methodology in recent workshops for educators at community colleges in New York, Illinois, Ohio and the New England region.  The Bridge Program has also recently been cited as a model transition program by Acting Assistant Secretary of the US Department of Education Johan Uvin.


    This winter, CCPI is partnering with the National College Transition Network to offer a public webinar series examining program and instructional shifts connected to new Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act (WIOA) legislation. To expand training and disseminate its models across the country, CCPI has also launched a new website ( http://www.laguardia.edu/CCPI). And a monthly newsletter featuring CCPI updates and best practices is available to the adult education and college access and success communities. 


    Olga Merchan, Director of Workforce Strategy at YouthBuild USA, commented, “If you want to build a successful bridge-to-college program, partner with LaGuardia Community College and learn from the best.”


    For more information on LaGuardia’s College and Career Pathways Institute contact ccpi@lagcc.cuny.edu or (718) 349-4015.


    •     •     •     •


    LaGuardia Community College located in Long Island City, Queens, was founded in 1971 as a bold experiment in opening the doors of higher education to all, and we proudly carry forward that legacy today. LaGuardia educates students through over 50 degree, certificate and continuing education programs, providing an inspiring place for students to achieve their dreams. Upon graduation, LaGuardia students’ lives are transformed as family income increases 17%, and students transfer to four-year colleges at three times the national average. Part of the City University of New York (CUNY), LaGuardia is a nationally recognized leader among community colleges for boundary-breaking success educating under served students. At LaGuardia we imagine new ideas, create new curriculum and pioneer programs to make our community and our country stronger. Visit www.laguardia.edu to learn more.

     State Education Department Officials Discuss Bridge Program

    State Education Department Officials Discuss Bridge Program Over Lunch with LaGuardia Community College President, Administrators and Students

    Bridge

    Long Island City, NY—November 13, 2014—President Gail O. Mellow and LaGuardia Community College administrators last week hosted New York State Education Department, New York State Board of Regents, and local elected officials at a luncheon held in LaGuardia’s NYDesigns center.


    State Board of Regents Chancellor Merryl Tisch, Regent Betty Rosa, Dist. 37 Assemblywoman Cathy Nolan, State Education Commissioner John B. King and Deputy Commissioner Kevin Smith met with Dr. Mellow, Associate Dean of Pre-College Programs Jane MacKillop, Executive Director of Pre-College Academic Programs Amy Dalsimer, and Executive Director for Adult Community Learning John Hunt.


    During the working lunch administrators gave the Education Department officials an overview of several LaGuardia programs that help adults who did not finish high school earn high school equivalency (HSE) diplomas and continue on to college: the Bridge to College and Careers Program, the Center for Immigrant Education and Training (CIET), and NY Basic Education and Skills Training (NYBEST) Programs.


    The Bridge to College and Careers Program provides career focused high school equivalency preparation and college readiness. CIET provides contextualized English, immigrant family literacy, and parent and civic engagement programs. NYBEST combines basic skills and technical instruction/vocational training to prepare students for employment.


    “We really are a community college,” Mellow said. “We take everybody who has a high school equivalency diploma and everything in between or a degree from a New York City public school, or an adult who got a degree in Brazil. We take them and say welcome, if you are going to give us the time, we’re going to create a system that allows you to succeed.”


    After a welcome from Dr. Mellow, MacKillop, Dalsimer and Hunt gave overviews of each program. After a sometimes spirited discussion about how the programs are funded, the state officials visited curriculum developer and Pre-College Academic Instructor Viktoriia Dudar’s Bridge to Health classroom, where Rosa, Hunt, Smith and Nolan sat with the students and took part in the class discussion.


    Students Sandra Chevalier, Melissa Derrick, Johnny Webb, Troy Paul, Yaritza Cabrera, Claudia Gastelum, Sabrina Prime, and Ann Marie Hennessy, each of them graduates or current students in the Bridge Program, and high school principals Hope Baxter (Energy and Tech High School), Linda Siegmund (Middle College High School), and Jaclyn Valane (International High School) joined the state officials for lunch.


    The students praised Dudar for her patience and teaching ability and credited the Bridge Program with changing their lives.


    “I went from I’m going to get my GED (General Equivalency Diploma) to I’m going to go to college, I can succeed in college,” said Hennessy. “I tried other GED programs, and there was such a lack of communication. You’re so welcome here. It’s so organized.”

    •     •     •     •

    LaGuardia Community College located in Long Island City, Queens, was founded in 1971 as a bold experiment in opening the doors of higher education to all, and we proudly carry forward that legacy today. LaGuardia educates students through over 50 degree, certificate and continuing education programs, providing an inspiring place for students to achieve their dreams. Upon graduation, LaGuardia students’ lives are transformed as family income increases 17%, and students transfer to four-year colleges at three times the national average. Part of the City University of New York (CUNY), LaGuardia is a nationally recognized leader among community colleges for boundary-breaking success educating underserved students. At LaGuardia we imagine new ideas, create new curriculum and pioneer programs to make our community and our country stronger. Visit www.laguardia.edu to learn more.




     The Korean Times Article on a Korean Food Vendor Support of LaGuardia

    “May It Give Hope To International Students...” Joo-Ho Kim, President Of Yogi and a Food Vendor, Supported LaGuardia Community College Scholarships 


    korean food truck article

    "I also had a difficult time during my overseas studies. Therefore, my operating principle is to provide large portions of delicious food at cheap prices to students, because I know that they don’t have a lot of extra money," said President Joo-Ho Kim.


    Of the four or five food carts located in front of the buildings at LaGuardia Community College (LaGCC) in Queens Long Island City, the line in front of one is exceptionally long. It is the Korean-food food cart “Yogi,” which is operated by President Joo-Ho Kim (43 years old), an ethnic Korean.


    Yogi’s main menu includes bulgogi, jeyukbokkeum and chicken teriyaki. Most of the students to patronize Yogi are LaGuardia students and foreign students. The students who have tried the food always give it a thumb up. President Kim’s food cart is unusually popular, not only because of the delicious taste of his food, but also thanks to his generous mindset which thinks of the students as his younger brothers and sisters.


    Last summer LaGuardia Community College had been challenged to raise $500,000 for student scholarships. President Kim is one of 282 donors who supported the College.


    President Kim, who graduated from college in Korea and then worked in the fashion business before going to study in Italy, laughed as he explained, “I was worried about meals during my difficult life as an international student and so I learned cooking from a neighbor Italian lady,” and “Rather than my following my fashion business studies, I became a gourmet chef instead.”


    President Kim came to New York in 1998 and studied Economics at Hunter College, but he slowly awakened to his hidden cooking skills that no one knew about and finally started this food cart business after graduating. President Kim said, “During my 20s and 30s, I didn’t really know what I wanted to do... But I slowly became aware of what true happiness is when I would see people eating the food which I made, even though it isn’t easy to go shopping for ingredients every day.”


    President Kim explained, “I wasn’t able to support with a lot of money but I hope that what I gave can be a small contribution to the students who are dreaming of the future even in their difficult circumstances.” He revealed that he intends to keep providing scholarship support in the future, too. “ (Journalist Ji-Hoon Cheon)


    View The Korean Times article: http://www.koreatimes.com/article/881299

     BET Reporter Samson Styles SharesSecond Chances With LaGuardia Community College Students

    BET Reporter Samson Styles Shares Second Chances With LaGuardia Community College Students


    Samson Styles BET 


    Long Island City, NY— October 21,2014Black Entertainment Television News Reporter and Documentarian Samson Styles brought his inspirational message to LaGuardia Community College, urging students try hard to make the right choices in life.


    “Most of my challenges came from making poor decisions,” Styles said. “Not a lot of people get second changes like I did. Where I come from, a lot of people are lucky to finish high school.”


    More than one hundred students gather in the E-Building atrium to hear Styles.  The LaGuardia Step Team opened the event with a rousing performance. Vice President for Student Affairs Dr. Michael Baston and Director of Student Life Kevin Jordan welcomed Styles to campus.


    "Sampson Style's journey reminds all of us that where we start in life does not always dictate where we can go or who we can become,” Baston said. “We are pleased to welcome him to LaGuardia and we encourage all in our community to believe in, and however possible, support second chances. We never know when we ourselves may be the one in need of a second chance."


    “Stories are the windows into your life,” Jordan said. “This gentleman has come to tell his story, and when he tells his story you are invited to think about your own story.”


    Styles’ visit as arranged by Darren Ferguson, Project Coordinator of LaGuardia’s Center for Diversity and Inclusion. Styles is shooting a segment on Ferguson for his BET program, “Second Chances,” which profiles people who create successful careers after leaving prison.


    Styles’ talk was his story, which explained how he turned his life around after serving eight years in jail.


    Styles’ parents moved the family to the Louis H. Pink Houses in Brooklyn’s East New York neighborhood when he was eight years old, from Park Slope, Brooklyn.


    He started acting tough to fit in with his new crowd.


    “Some adversity you face is circumstantial, you have no control over,” Styles said. “But some adversity is made worse by poor choices.”


    Styles was nine years old when he started picking pockets with a group of neighborhood teens. “We used to call it getting money,” he said. “My mother would get calls from the local police precinct saying they picked up her son for this and that.”


    A good student, Styles said he “dumbed himself down” to fit in with his new friends. He kept running the streets. At 12 years old he did 18 months in juvenile detention. At 15 he was with a friend who killed someone and spent seven years in the penitentiary.


    “Again, I faced adversity because of my poor decision making,” Styles told LaGuardia students.


    Released in 2014, Styles returned to Brooklyn hoping to get into the recording industry but a friend persuaded him film was a better choice. Styles started shooting underground girl fights in Brownsville. A trailer he made from films of several fights was impressive enough to get him an interview with BET hierarchy, where he started filming segments for one of the network’s newsmagazines.


    Styles told the LaGuardia students that being on television did not insulate him from offers to resume the lifestyle that got him sent to prison.  “But I turned down those opportunities,” he said. “I wanted to do positive things in the community.


    “I’m letting you know that being here, in school, you are on the right path,” Styles said. “You might feel sometimes that you can’t make it, but ask yourself how many adversities you put on yourself.


    “To be here at LaGuardia and be able to inspire and motivate  students, that’s how I motivate myself,” Styles said.


    Last summer LaGuardia's Division of Adult and Continuing Education, working with the city Department of Corrections, completed the first phase of a pilot job training program for women in the Rose M. Singer Center on Riker’s Island.  


    "Having Samson Styles here at LaGuardia was a great opportunity to see what we can do with determination and a made up mind, even after being victimized by our own poor choices,” Ferguson said. “Mr. Styles showed our students, through his personal testimony, that success on a grand scale is possible even after what seems like a life altering error."

     

     •     •     •     •


    LaGuardia Community College located in Long Island City, Queens, was founded in 1971 as a bold experiment in opening the doors of higher education to all, and we proudly carry forward that legacy today. LaGuardia educates students through over 50 degree, certificate and continuing education programs, providing an inspiring place for students to achieve their dreams. Upon graduation, LaGuardia students’ lives are transformed as family income increases 17%, and students transfer to four-year colleges at three times the national average. Part of the City University of New York (CUNY), LaGuardia is a nationally recognized leader among community colleges for boundary-breaking success educating underserved students. At LaGuardia we imagine new ideas, create new curriculum and pioneer programs to make our community and our country stronger. Visit www.laguardia.edu to learn more.

     LaGuardia Community College Food Cart Vendors Know Staff and the Students They Serve

    LaGuardia Community College Food Cart Vendors Know Staff and the Students They Serve

    halal   

    Long Island City, NY—September 30, 2014—LaGuardia Community College students, faculty and staff love eggs, aren’t as picky eaters as folks in other parts of the city, and love to snack between classes.

     

    This information comes from people who know the food cart vendors along Thomson Avenue, who feed hundreds of LaGuardia community members each school day.

     

    “My business philosophy is always to have a business around schools and students because they eat all the time,” said Elsayed, who has run the Mando Halal Food cart since 2000.

     

    “Students are easy to serve,” said John, who did not want his last name used. John runs the Coffee Bagel Cart near Van Dam Avenue and says he sells close to fifty egg sandwiches a day, making them one of his top selling dishes.

     

    “LaGuardia students are very patient, very, very patient,” said Juho Kim, who has been running the popular Yogi Food Cart by himself since his assistant had a hernia operation. “Kids always have a next class so they have to run. I feel so bad that they have to wait, but it’s only me. I do everything as fast as I can, but they keep waiting, waiting.”

     

    LaGuardia Community College, known as “The World’s Community College,” has one of the most diverse student bodies in New York City, with students from more than 157 countries, speaking over 111 languages.

     

    Yet, they have a lot in common. They share the dream of creating a better future for themselves and their families, and if you ask the vendors—they like to eat.

     

    Mohamad Mohamad’s Habbia Cart specializes in breakfast items “because there is a lot of competition for lunch,” Mohamad said.

     

    Carts offer speed, good food and low prices, Mohamad said, which makes them competitive. But having a business on wheels doesn’t diminish the need to service your customers if you expect them to come back, Mohamad said. 

     

    “We sell things cheap that can fill you up, something nice they can afford,” he said. “Go to a restaurant and they sell you a cup of coffee for $4 or $5 and you stay a half hour.”

     

    “Here the coffee is seventy five cents to one dollar and we talk and have fun,” Mohamad said. “If he has a problem with the cup we give him another one, no problem.”

     

    The men live in Queens and Brooklyn. They all tow their carts on the back of their cars or panel vans each workday from storage yards where they are kept overnight. Some of the yards restock the carts overnight, while some of the owners make their food at home and replenish the carts themselves each morning.

     

    Their stories of how they came to run their businesses are as colorful and intriguing as those of many of their LaGuardia customers.

     

    Elsayed graduated from law school in his native Alexandria, Egypt, but decided law was not for him. “I did it for my father,” he said. “He wanted me to be a lawyer. When I graduated I gave him the certificate.”

     

    Elsayed’s father was a spice merchant, and his son was able to put his knowledge of a variety of condiments to good use in his cart even though he didn’t cook when he moved here in 1986. He worked several jobs, including dishwasher at a Port Jefferson, NY restaurant.

     

    One night the restaurant’s chef stormed out after having words with the owner. Elsayed said he “knew everything about the kitchen” and stepped in to do prep work. He cooked there for ten years.

     

    His food vendor career got off to a rocky start. “The first day, nobody knew me so nobody came,” he said. “I made forty dollars and had to throw away almost eight hundred dollars worth of food because I could not keep it. It was rough. But over time it got better.”

     

    Kim owned a nail salon in Stony Brook when he saw a newspaper advertisement from a man, who happened to be Korean, who wanted to sell his food cart. “I had lived in France with a woman who taught me to cook some things, and I would cook for my wife and daughter,” he said.

     

    Kim sold the salon and bought the cart, one of the more popular food stands on the street with dishes like teriyaki chicken. With his assistant out, that success has meant more work for him. “It’s a lot of work; you have no idea,” he said. “If I knew that before, I might not have done it.”

     

    Mohamed majored in sports therapy in Egypt, but found the additional courses he’d have to take to be certified here too expensive when he immigrated here ten years ago.

     

    He said he worked a variety of jobs, including on a food truck near Columbia University Medical Center. Mohamed learned the business from scratch, and there was a lot to learn.

     

    “You have to learn how to use gas, how not to burn yourself, which food to cook first cause it takes longer,” he said.  “It is not easy stuff, because if the customer is not satisfied they are not going to come back.”

     

     Mohamed rents his cart, which specializes in lunch items like kebabs and sausages, from a man named John, who Mohamed said worked the cart for almost two decades but gave up after enduring the brutal cold last winter.

     

    Business is good, but tighter because competition from other carts “means you can’t raise your prices.”

     

    John, from the Philippines, has been in New York for fifteen years and has run his cart on the same corner outside LaGuardia for ten years. He taught himself to cook, he said, experimenting with recipes at home.  “Though the ten hour days are hard,” John said what he likes most about the work is that “my inventory is low and I don’t have to worry about overhead costs.”

     

    Last summer, when the LaGuardia Community College Foundation was challenged to raise $500K for the students’ scholarships, LaGuardia reached out to local businesses.  Each of the vendors in this story contributed to the LaGuardia Million Dollar Challenge. 

     

    “I was a student too, so I have feelings for them,” said Elsayed.Today he’s a student. Tomorrow we don’t know what he will be. You have to support him. Today you have to give back,” he said. “That is what we did.”

    yogi


    •     •     •     •


    LaGuardia Community College located in Long Island City, Queens, was founded in 1971 as a bold experiment in opening the doors of higher education to all, and we proudly carry forward that legacy today. LaGuardia educates students through over 50 degree, certificate and continuing education programs, providing an inspiring place for students to achieve their dreams. Upon graduation, LaGuardia students’ lives are transformed as family income increases 17%, and students transfer to four-year colleges at three times the national average. Part of the City University of New York (CUNY), LaGuardia is a nationally recognized leader among community colleges for boundary-breaking success educating underserved students. At LaGuardia we imagine new ideas, create new curriculum and pioneer programs to make our community and our country stronger. Visit www.laguardia.edu to learn more.

     Goldman Sachs 10,000 Small Businesses Program at LAGCC Receives $5 Million for Education Center

    Goldman Sachs 10,000 Small Businesses Program at LaGuardia Community College Receives $5 Million for Education Center


    Long Island City, NY—August 1, 2014—The Goldman Sachs 10,000 Small Businesses Program at LaGuardia Community College is about to receive a $5 million boost, courtesy of Governor Andrew Cuomo and the State of New York.

    The capital money will be used to create the 10,000 Small Businesses Education Center, which will permanently house the program that helps entrepreneurs grow their companies and create jobs.

    “The students at New York City’s public colleges and universities have provided the world with game-changing ideas in fields ranging from healthcare to manufacturing. Through the CUNY 2020 program we are maximizing those ideas to create economic opportunity for New Yorkers,” Governor Cuomo said. “The first round of CUNY 2020 projects will help link some of our best and brightest students with positions in high-tech sectors, while leveraging their academic excellence to support economic development and create new opportunities throughout the New York City area. By funding these eight projects we are making an investment in New York’s future, and I am proud to present these awards to the first round of CUNY 2020 recipients.”

    “We’ve seen through our 10,000 Small Businesses program that public-private partnerships can spur job creation, strengthening communities,” said Lloyd C. Blankfein, Chairman and CEO of Goldman Sachs. “We are proud that the program has served as a catalyst for Governor Cuomo’s Economic Development Fund’s investment in LaGuardia Community College and know that the Center will become an important resource to small business owners in New York.”

    “This extraordinary partnership between LaGuardia and Goldman Sachs has helped numerous small business owners gain the skills they need to make their businesses flourish and hire new employees,” said LaGuardia Community College President Gail O. Mellow. “This $5 million capital grant from Governor Cuomo will create a permanent home for the program and allow us to strengthen our work with local businesses.”

    The Goldman Sachs 10,000 Small Businesses Program at LaGuardia provides practical business management education that helps participants develop the skills needed to helm a successful business.

    Participants attend 11 class sessions, receive business support services and one-on-one help from a team of business professionals to create a business plan tailored to their company needs.

    Nearly 450 businesses have participated in the program to date, and the program will continue to serve approximately 100 businesses per year. Approximately 70 percent of graduates report increased revenues in businesses and 50 percent of graduates have created jobs.

    This infusion of public dollars represents the recognition of policy makers that the Goldman Sachs 10,000 Small Businesses is an effective driver of economic growth and job creation.

    Goldman Sachs 10,000 Small Businesses is a $500 million national program designed to help small businesses in the United States create jobs and economic growth by providing entrepreneurs with practical business education, access to capital and business support services.

    The $5 million is part of $55 million in grants CUNY and Empire State Development awarded to eight economic development projects involving 20 CUNY campuses. The grants are designed to connect academic institutions with entrepreneurship to stimulate the local economic development.

    •     •     •     •


    LaGuardia Community College located in Long Island City, Queens, was founded in 1971 as a bold experiment in opening the doors of higher education to all, and we proudly carry forward that legacy today. LaGuardia educates students through over 50 degree, certificate and continuing education programs, providing an inspiring place for students to achieve their dreams. Upon graduation, LaGuardia students’ lives are transformed as family income increases 17%, and students transfer to four-year colleges at three times the national average. Part of the City University of New York (CUNY), LaGuardia is  a nationally recognized leader among community colleges for boundary-breaking success education underserved students. At LaGuardia we imagine new ideas, create new curriculum and pioneer programs to make our community and our country stronger. Visit  www.laguardia.edu to learn more.




     The David Grainger Foundation presents the LaGuardia Community College Foundation with $5000

    The David Grainger Foundation Presents the LaGuardia Community College Foundation with $5000


    Grainger pic

    Long Island City, NY—July 1, 2014—Grainger Industrial Supply officials present LaGuardia Community College President Gail O. Mellow with a $5,000 check from the David Grainger Foundation.


    Taking part in the ceremony, from left to right, are Grainger Account Manager Jim Dodson; Dr. Mellow; LaGuardia student and scholarship recipient Enes Malik Akdemir; Grainger Market Manager for Queens William Draghi; Grainger District Manager Tania Godoy; LaGuardia Community College Foundation Board Vice Chairman Suresh Sani; LaGuardia student and scholarship recipient Diriana Tejada; LaGuardia Vice President, Division for Institutional Advancement Susan Lyddon, and LaGuardia Vice President of Administration Shahir Erfan.


    •     •     •     •

    About the LaGuardia Community College Foundation

    The LaGuardia Community College Foundation ensures that ambitious students have the resources they need to receive a college education and improve their families’ lives. More than 70% of LaGuardia students come from homes where the annual family income is under $25,000. Since 2003, Foundation donors have contributed more than $8 million, which has provided scholarships, textbooks, transportation and tutoring for students in need. To learn more visit  www.laguardia.edu/Supporters-Friends/Home.

     

    About LaGuardia Community College

    A nationally recognized leader among community colleges, LaGuardia Community College was founded in 1971 as the ultimate experiment in opening the doors of higher education to all, and we proudly carry forward that legacy today.  Part of the City University of New York (CUNY), LaGuardia educates students through over 50 degree, certificate and continuing education programs.  Upon graduation, LaGuardia students’ lives are transformed as family income increases 17%, and students transfer to four-year colleges at three times the national average.  At LaGuardia, we imagine new ideas, create new curriculum and pioneer programs to make our community and our country stronger.  Visit www.laguardia.edu to learn more.

     

     Vanguard Director at LaGuardia Community College Wins Literacy Recognition Award

    Vanguard Director at LaGuardia Community College Wins Literacy Recognition Award


    Amy

    Long Island City, NY—June 20, 2014—Amy Dalsimer, Executive Director of Pre-College Academic Programs at LaGuardia Community College, has won a 2014 Literacy Recognition Award from the Literacy Assistance Center in New York. The annual award honors literacy practitioners for outstanding contributions to students, their program or the New York City literacy community. There were seven winners citywide this year.


    Ms. Dalsimer has been a trailblazer in contextualized and integrated instruction in the New York area for over 20 years. The Bridge to College and Careers Program (Bridge Program), which gears high school equivalency preparation towards careers and college readiness, as well as the Supporting Adults through Vocational EMT Training Program (S.A.V.E. EMT Program), which combines basic skills instruction with technical training, are two examples of innovative programs that she has pioneered and that have been instrumental in helping students achieve their educational and professional goals.


    “LaGuardia is on the cutting edge of developmental instruction for high school equivalency preparation and vocational training, thanks to Amy Dalsimer and her staff,” said Gail O. Mellow, President of LaGuardia. “They are creating groundbreaking methods of effective contextualized instruction that are serving as a model for the rest of the country.”


    The focus on math and literacy skills in the context of vocational training (called the NYBEST model, based on Washington State's Integrated Basic Education and Skills Training (I-BEST) initiative) has proven successful. In the past four years, approximately 240 students have enrolled in the S.A.V.E. EMT Program, and 85% completed and passed the NY State EMT certification exam. Eighty percent of those were able to find employment with ambulance companies, the FDNY, and hospitals in the metro area. Now more New Yorkers have access to this career pathway, are realizing their career goals, and are serving New York City in providing vital pre-hospital emergency care. 


    The central feature of the Bridge Program is the implementation of contextualized, career-focused curricula. Contextualized instruction is a sector-based approach to developmental instruction that uses authentic materials from one career area to build basic skills. Ms. Dalsimer has led the curriculum development and program design for the Bridge Program since its inception, using the sectors of business, health and science. To date, more that 1,000 students have been served in the program. The GED exam pass rate of the last Bridge Program group that took the test in December 2013 was 67%, compared with New York State’s latest pass rate of 53% in 2012-13.


    Ms. Dalsimer has also been tireless in her efforts to provide training on this kind of instruction for other institutions and literacy professionals nationwide through her creation of and work in the College and Careers Pathways Institute at LaGuardia.


    “It has been my great pleasure and honor to work with adult learners for the last 25 years in their quest to improve their education and career prospects,” said Ms. Dalsimer. “The students’ hard work and the unwavering commitment of my colleagues in the adult education community have been my daily inspiration. I am proud to receive this recognition but consider it a shared honor that belongs to all of these remarkable adult students and their dedicated educators.”                                                                           


    The Bridge Program is funded by Robin Hood Foundation and the S.A.V.E. EMT Program is currently funded by the U.S. Department of Labor through its Trade Adjustment Assistance Community College and Career Training (TAACCCT) grant program. 


    Find out more about this year’s Literacy Recognition Awards at http://www.lacnyc.org/Awards.

       

    •     •     •     •

     

    LaGuardia Community College located in Long Island City, Queens, was founded in 1971 as a bold experiment in opening the doors of higher education to all, and we proudly carry forward that legacy today. LaGuardia educates students through over 50 degree, certificate and continuing education programs, providing an inspiring place for students to achieve their dreams. Upon graduation, LaGuardia students’ lives are transformed as family income increases 17%, and students transfer to four-year colleges at three times the national average. Part of the City University of New York (CUNY), LaGuardia is a nationally recognized leader among community colleges for boundary-breaking success education underserved students. At LaGuardia we imagine new ideas, create new curriculum and pioneer programs to make our community and our country stronger. Visit www.laguardia.edu to learn more.

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