• News Center
  • LaGuardia Community College News Center


    Learn about our innovative academic programs, successful business initiatives, award-winning faculty and our hard-working students. 

     

    News stories

  •  A LaGuardia Community College Student Awarded a National Scholarship That Will Allow Her to Continue Her Education
    A LaGuardia Community College Student Awarded a National Scholarship
    That Will Allow Her to Continue Her Education


    One of the most prestigious and the largest transfer scholarships available to community college students

    Cristina Mihailescu


    Long Island City, NY—April 23, 2014—Cristina Mihailescu, a LaGuardia Community College Honors student, was facing a major dilemma.  The international student and 40-year-old single mother of two young daughters was graduating in June with the hope of transferring to a four-year institution, but financial constraints were making it seem impossible.

    As an international student who must pay exorbitant tuition costs, even Baruch College, an affordable City of University of New York college that accepted her into its bachelor’s program, seemed unattainable.

    But that was before Cristina was awarded the Jack Kent Cooke Foundation’s 2014 Undergraduate Transfer Scholarship, which will provide her with as much as $30,000 a year for up to three years to complete her bachelor’s degree.  The LaGuardia scholarship recipient was among 85 finalists selected from 3,705 applications representing 737 community colleges from 48 states, two U.S. territories, and the District of Columbia.  It is the largest cohort in the program’s 13-year history.

    “It is like a miracle,” said a still-shocked Cristina who said she was afraid she would wake up and find out it was just a dream.  “One year ago I was struggling to make it from semester to semester and was wondering if graduating from LaGuardia was possible.  Now, I feel like I was reborn.  I can start dreaming big because the scholarship has not only eased my financial burden, it has opened the doors to so many opportunities.”

    Dreaming big now means having the opportunity to apply to such selective institutions as Columbia University and New York University’s Stern School of Business where she will pursue a degree in economics.  The dream extends to a master’s in economic development and a career at the United Nations where she hopes to help developing countries find sustainable solutions to their economic problems.

    Her desire to aid developing countries was planted years ago when she was growing up in communist Romania.  “It was a time where human freedom was denied, people lived in poverty, basic food products were scarce and electricity was rationed,” said Cristina, who recalled studying by candlelight because the electricity was shut off in the evenings.  “Looking back, I don’t know how people survived.”  

    At the age of 23, Cristina fled Romania after landing a job as a bartender on a cruise liner.  “I knew I had to grab any opportunity, so when the job on the cruise ship came I jumped on it,” she said.  

    The cruise liner took her around the world and six years later she finally arrived at her desired destination: The United States.  “I always dreamt of coming to America and completing my education so I could make a contribution to society and make the world a better place,” she said.  “I know it sounds cliché, but this is what I truly want to do.” 

    Cristina added that this was the dream that her mother—a single mom who raised Cristina and her sister on her own, worked hard, but always had time to help others—wished for her.  “She was my greatest inspiration,” she said.  “Her example has given me values by which I have come to understand are the two most important things in life: realizing one’s full potential while helping to make the world a better place.  I have been inspired by her integrity, dedication, work ethic and charity, and have sought out activities that reflect my life philosophy, educational goals and professional aims.”

    The émigré settled in Queens and dedicated herself to raising her two daughters.  All that time she wished to go back to school, but her devotion to her children and her financial constraints put her dream on hold.  She finally got the opportunity in 2011, when, at the age of 37, she enrolled in LaGuardia as a business administration major.  

    But after being out of school for 17 years, she began her college experience with a host of insecurities.  “During my first semester, I said to myself, ‘do I belong here? How am I going to manage.’”

    Despite feeling completely “lost” at first, Cristina refused to give up.  She concentrated on her studies and took advantage of the college’s resources—tutoring and department review sessions—and soon her professors were handing her back perfect exams and papers.  Today, she manages to maintain a perfect 4.0 G.P.A., while juggling family responsibilities and dealing with her constant financial challenges.

    “Cristina is a fighter with the determination of a champion,” said Accounting Professor Rajendra Bhika. “She sees difficult periods of her life as opportunities for great learning and triumph, and believes that education is the only way she will be able to face the difficulties that are still to come.” 

    The same intelligence, energy and commitment she brought to the classroom were also on display in her extracurricular activities: a member of the Honors Student Advisory Committee, the student-centered collective of the Honors Program that organizes transfer activities; representative of a student delegation of Mozambique at the 2013 Model U.N. conference; a participant in UNICEF’s 2013 “Fulfilling the Promise” challenge; and an accounting tutor.

    Throughout her time at LaGuardia, the college provided support in several ways.  While she was taking classes, Cristina was able to enroll her youngest daughter, Sophie, in the Early Childhood Learning Center.  And since her international student status allows her to work on campus, her part-time job as a tutor paid a small stipend.  Currently, she is on a paid internship at MetLife’s Legal Affairs Department.

    “I am not sure I would have been able to pursue a degree at LaGuardia, if not for the support of the institution, its professors and staff,” said Cristina.  “To me, LaGuardia was my second home, a secure environment where I knew I could get encouragement and guidance.”

    “Cristina’s achievements are simply outstanding,” said Dr. Gail O. Mellow, president of LaGuardia.  “Despite insurmountable obstacles, she persevered and accomplished what she set out to do.  And LaGuardia and its faculty and staff were always there to help make sure her goals were attained.  The Jack Kent Cooke Foundation is to be applauded for recognizing and supporting the talented students that emerge from LaGuardia and other community colleges.”

    With graduation in June, Cristina is busy working on her transfer applications to several selective, private institutions.  But, wherever she decides to go, she said that with strength and perseverance, she is determined to achieve her ultimate goals for her and her daugthers. 

    “Every time I look into their eyes,” she said, “I know that I have to work harder to show them that we can achieve our dreams regardless of any obstacles we encounter.” 

    •    •     •     •


    LaGuardia Community College located in Long Island City, Queens, was founded in 1971 as a bold experiment in opening the doors of higher education to all, and we proudly carry forward that legacy today. LaGuardia educates students through over 50 degree, certificate and continuing education programs, providing an inspiring place for students to achieve their dreams. Upon graduation, LaGuardia students’ lives are transformed as family income increases 17%, and students transfer to four-year colleges at three times the national average. Part of the City University of New York (CUNY), LaGuardia is a nationally recognized leader among community colleges for boundary-breaking success educating underserved students. At LaGuardia we imagine new ideas, create new curriculum and pioneer programs to make our community and our country stronger. Visit www.laguardia.edu to learn more.

    ###

     LaGuardia, Hostos, CCNY Align Environmental Engineering Programs
    LaGuardia, Hostos, CCNY Align Environmental Engineering Programs


    Shared common infrastructure, administration and academic support aim to raise graduation rates, participation of underrepresented groups.


    Long Island City, NY—April 23, 2014—Beginning in the fall 2014 semester, LaGuardia Community College and Hostos Community College will offer associate degrees in earth system science and environmental engineering (ESE). Students completing the programs will be able to transfer seamlessly to the Grove School of Engineering at The City College of New York to earn bachelor’s degrees in this high-demand engineering discipline.

    Supported by a $4 million U.S. Department of Education grant, the Alliance for Continuous Learning Environments (CILES) program employs new methods and advanced technologies to improve retention and graduation rates among students who transfer from community colleges to the Grove School. 
     
    “The three institutions will operate as a continuous learning environment with common infrastructure, administration and academic support,” said Dr. Jorge González, NOAA-CREST Professor of Mechanical Engineering at City College’s Grove School of Engineering. Professor González is principal investigator on the grant, half of which is earmarked for infrastructure, labs and breakout rooms. 

    Special facilities equipped with advanced technology will be used for study groups, tutorial sessions, faculty advising and mentoring. In addition, students and faculty will have access to resources of the NOAA-CREST Center, a leading facility for research and training in all aspects of environmental remote sensing.

    Professor González said he envisions the program serving as a model for CUNY and other urban universities affiliated with community colleges that can improve retention and graduation rates among students at risk.

    Academic support will be linked to a newly developed early alert system that tracks students at risk for low academic performance. These students will receive additional counseling and be invited to one-on-one and group tutoring sessions to address their weaknesses.

    “Transfer students account for approximately half of the Grove School's undergraduate population, so smoothing the transition from community college to senior college is a key priority for the school,” Professor González noted. Additionally, the program is designed to increase participation of underrepresented Hispanic and low-income students in the growing ESE field.

    According to the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, demand for environmental engineers is expected to grow by 15 percent between 2012 and 2022; demand for environmental engineering technicians expected to grow by 14 percent during the same period. This is faster than the average for all occupations. 

    Hostos Associate Professor Nieves Angulo, who helped secure the grants for this initiative and is a co-PI, called the new environmental engineering program is a pathway to equal educational opportunity. 

    “This is really about expanding the horizon for our students, we are building two breakout rooms now, and our hope is that they will be ready for the fall,” she said. “By offering web-based tutoring, we can save students time so they can concentrate on their classes, and we want that for them. We are very proud that this collaboration has improved our curriculum for the STEM fields.”

    "This articulation program will provide students in our environmental engineering program with a seamless transition to City College's earth system science and environmental engineering program," added Dr. Yasser Hassebo, associate professor in LaGuardia’s math, engineering and computer science department and CILES project co-PI.  "This will ensure that more of our graduates, many of whom are underserved, will pursue a degree and future career in the STEM field."

    About The City College of New York
    Since 1847, The City College of New York has provided low-cost, high-quality education for New Yorkers in a wide variety of disciplines.  More than 16,000 students pursue undergraduate and graduate degrees in: the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences; the Bernard and Anne Spitzer School of Architecture; the School of Education; the Grove School of Engineering; the Sophie Davis School of Biomedical Education, and the Colin Powell School for Civic and Global Leadership. U.S. News, Princeton Review and Forbes all rank City College among the best colleges and universities in the United States. For additional information, please visit www.ccny.cuny.edu/.

    About The Grove School of Engineering at CCNY
    The Grove School of Engineering at The City College of New York is the only public engineering school within New York City.  It offers Bachelors, Masters and Ph.D. degrees in seven fields: biomedical, chemical, civil, computer, electrical, and mechanical engineering and computer science.  The School is recognized nationally for the excellence of its instructional and research programs and ranks among the most diverse engineering schools in the country. For additional information, please visit www.ccny.cuny.edu/engineering/.

    About LaGuardia Community College
    LaGuardia Community College located in Long Island City, Queens, was founded in 1971 as a bold experiment in opening the doors of higher education to all, and we proudly carry forward that legacy today. LaGuardia educates students through over 50 degree, certificate and continuing education programs, providing an inspiring place for students to achieve their dreams. Upon graduation, LaGuardia students’ lives are transformed as family income increases 17%, and students transfer to four-year colleges at three times the national average. Part of the City University of New York (CUNY), LaGuardia is a nationally recognized leader among community colleges for boundary-breaking success educating underserved students. At LaGuardia we imagine new ideas, create new curriculum and pioneer programs to make our community and our country stronger. Visit www.laguardia.edu to learn more.

    About Hostos Community College
    Eugenio Marí de Hostos Community College is an educational agent for change that has been transforming and improving the quality of life in the South Bronx and neighboring communities since 1968. It serves as a gateway to intellectual growth and socioeconomic mobility, as well as a point of departure for lifelong learning, success in professional careers, and transfer to advanced higher education programs. The College’s unique "Student Success Coaching Unit" provides students with individualized guidance and exemplifies its emphasis on student support services. 
     
    Hostos offers 29 associate degree programs and five certificate programs that facilitate easy transfer to CUNY’s four-year colleges or baccalaureate studies at other institutions. The College has an award-winning Division of Continuing Education & Workforce Development that offers professional development courses and certificate-bearing workforce training programs. Hostos is part of The City University of New York (CUNY), the nation’s leading urban public university, which serves more than 480,000 students at 24 colleges. For additional information, please visit www.hostos.cuny.edu/.


    ###

     One-Stop-Shop for Financial Help at LaGuardia’s Single Stop
    One-Stop-Shop for Financial Help at LaGuardia’s Single Stop


    Long Island City, NY—April 23, 2014—Pinching pennies was necessary for Dawn Davis, a 40-year-old single mother who was supporting her two sons while pursuing a degree at LaGuardia Community College.  So when it came time to file her taxes, instead of going to a company that would charge her hundreds of dollars, she turned to the College’s Single Stop, a center that provides students with free financial services. 

    “Going through Single Stop is excellent, it’s ideal for me,” said Ms. Davis, who interns at the center.  “Being a mom, I can use that $300, $400 towards food. Doing the taxes for free here is a great benefit to my family.”

    Single Stop is a one-stop-shop financial assistance program on the LaGuardia campus that focuses on helping students maintain economic security and this year helped almost 1,100 students file for taxes. 

    “Our goal is to provide support services,” said Rhonda Mouton, the program director at LaGuardia. “We want to help students alleviate any financial stress so they can use their money for their education.”

    As the recent tax deadline approached, Single Stop partnered with the Food Bank of New York City to provide students with free tax assistance to file for their refund. 

    “The Food Bank is part of the VITA program,” said Rosario Licetti, the Food Bank’s site manager at LaGuardia. The Volunteer Income Tax Assistance program works with lower income employees, persons with disabilities and limited English speaking taxpayers. 

    This tax season, Single Stop and the Food Bank were able to provide assistance to LaGuardia students and their family members as well as some employees of the school.

    First opening its doors in 2010, Single Stop has helped thousands of students and their families. In 2013 alone, Single Stop was able to connect almost 4,600 LaGuardia students to financial professionals.

    Amid class assignments, part-time and full-time jobs and providing family members and their own children, students must also learn to file taxes, enroll in health insurance and budget their finances. Single Stop assumes a median role of connecting students with private organizations and professionals who can provide direction for free. 

    Located in the C-Building, the non-profit organization provides other services including legal assistance, financial planning and benefits screening. 

    “Based on their eligibility, we help students with their government assistance,” said Ms. Mouton. “We can provide SNAP, healthcare, immigration services, child support and unemployment. Students can actually apply for government assistance here.”

    In providing financial assistance and legal counseling, Single Stop partners with The Financial Clinic, a New York City-based company that focuses on helping low-income and working-poor families. 

    “Everyone has a unique situation and the financial component is very big,” Ms. Mouton said. “It’s showing them how to handle their money.”

    Single Stop does not only provide financial assistance for their students. Since August 2013, Single Stop has been conducting a trial run for a food pantry located in the same building. 

    “We help 50 families a week,” said Ms. Mouton, “providing food for three meals a day.”

    Students can only come via appointment, but after registering they are able to receive food on a needed basis. Guidelines to receive food from the pantry are made flexible to accommodate more students, according to Mouton. 

    Single Stop offers its help to all students. The organization recognizes that even students who work full time need help managing their money. 

    “Any student can come to Single Stop,” said Ms. Mouton. “They don’t have to be low income, they just have to be in need.”

    While interning for them, Ms. Davis, a Flushing resident, received the financial benefits made available to her to help improve her credit and apply for government assistance programs like SNAP. Having since graduated from LaGuardia, she now works part time with Single Stop and is pursuing a degree in social work at Lehman College. 

    “The positive impact they made in my life, I want to do that for someone else.” Ms. Davis said. 


    


    LaGuardia Community College located in Long Island City, Queens, was founded in 1971 as a bold experiment in opening the doors of higher education to all, and we proudly carry forward that legacy today. LaGuardia educates students through over 50 degree, certificate and continuing education programs, providing an inspiring place for students to achiever their dreams. Upon graduation, LaGuardia students’ lives are transformed as family income increases 17%, and students transfer to four-year colleges at three times the national average. Part of the City University of New York (CUNY), LaGuardia is a nationally recognized leader among community colleges for boundary-breaking success education underserved students. At LaGuardia we imagine new ideas, create new curriculum and pioneer programs to make our community and our country stronger. Visit www.laguardia.edu to learn more.

    ###

     LaGuardia Community College Student Selected to Participate In Remote Sensing Research on the Environment

    LaGuardia Community College Student Selected to Participate
    In Remote Sensing Research on the Environment

    One of 10 CUNY Undergraduates, and the Only Woman, to be Chosen 

    Keisha Baxter, Zahidur


    Long Island City, NY—April 23, 2014—Keisha Baxter, a LaGuardia Community College civil engineering student, will not be spending the summer in the open air, but researching air quality in a lab as a participant in a highly competitive City University of New York research program. 

    Keisha is among 10 CUNY undergraduate students, and the only woman, to be selected to participate in the National Science Foundation Research Experiences for Undergraduates (REU) in Satellite and Ground-Based Remote Sensing Project at the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration-Cooperative Remote Sensing Science and Technology Center (NOAA-CREST) at City College.  

    The program, which is specifically designed for minority students majoring in STEM programs, will have the young researchers, through remote sensing, collect and analyze data culled from data satellites.  The students will come away learning all aspects of remote sensing including sensor development, satellite remote sensing, ground-based field measurements, data processing and analysis, modeling and forecasting.

    The program’s website spells out its mission.  “We expect that through our unique and innovative endeavors many underrepresented minority students who would otherwise not pursue STEM education altogether or would not pursue STEM education through to graduate school level will now choose to follow the STEM corridor to either graduate education or to careers in STEM.”

    “This experience is perfect for me because its ties my passion for civil engineering with my interest in protecting the environment,” said an effusive Keisha.  “I want to be a researcher in the Crest REU program, where I can add my creativity and vision to the team, learning more and being able to apply my insight to the program and later to the vast world of engineering; and be a problem solver and the best civil engineer, teacher and student that I can be.”

    While Keisha will be researching air quality, the other student researchers will be looking at pollution, water quality and oceanography.  During the nine weeks, she will be collecting and analyzing satellite data and doing mathematical calculations on air quality.  She will then return to the lab for three weeks in the fall and again for three weeks in the spring to update her data.  Also, during those two three-week periods she will present her research at various conferences such as the American Geological Society and the Emerging Researchers National.  

    “My experience at LaGuardia has provided me with a rock-solid foundation in the field,” said Keisha, who is maintaining a 3.35 G.P.A. “This research project is the icing on the cake.”

    With her superb mathematical skills and motivation, Dr. Zahidur Rahman, her faculty mentor and mathematics professor, is confident that she will thrive in this experience. “She brings to this project her strong intellect, creativity and dedication to whatever challenge she takes on,” he said.

    For the 20-year-old, who emigrated to the U.S. from British Guiana in 2006, math was always her strong suit. “When I entered eighth grade, I excelled in mathematics,” said Keisha.  “I first found out this was pretty fun stuff.” 

    In high school she added science as another subject where she stood out.  So when it came time to look at colleges, her calculus teacher encouraged her to consider engineering.  “I heard about engineering, but I didn’t know what it was,” said she with a laugh.  “But after researching the field and learning it had a heavy focus on math and science, I couldn’t see myself doing anything else.  It seemed perfect.”

    Choosing LaGuardia over colleges in Arizona and Florida, Keisha enrolled in the civil engineering program in the spring of 2012.  “I knew LaGuardia was the right choice for me and where my journey to becoming a civil engineer would begin,” she said.

    She jumped right into the college experience, taking six classes her first semester.  When her engineering lab professor invited her to join his research project that was looking at the effects vibrational therapy has on patients with osteoporosis, she eagerly accepted.  To analyze the response of osteoporosis bone specs to vibrational therapy, she learned the computer program, Comsol.  

    “Participating in this program allowed me to learn about the importance of computer-aided modeling and the great part it plays in aiding our research,” she said.  “I also learned the ethics, discipline and time management associated with research work.”

    While concentrating on her studies, she finds time to tutor students in math and to teach a lab section to four classes about the application of mathematics.  “I strongly believe that people who have acquired knowledge in a particular subject should share it with others,” she said.

    She also is the Engineering Club Student’s Association representative.

    Keisha will be graduating in June, and through LaGuardia’s articulation program with City College, she will pursue her bachelor’s degree in structural or environmental specialization. Upon receiving her bachelor’s degree, she will become a CREST scholar where the program will cover her tuition costs at the graduate level.  Thereafter, she can have a professional career opportunity at NOAA and/or other federal, state and local agencies, academia and industries.

    “It has been a wonderful road, and LaGuardia and its professors got me on that road to a civil engineering degree and a career in the field,” said Keisha.  “I encourage other students, especially minority students, to take advantage of all the amazing opportunities that are available to them.”

    •    •     •     •


    LaGuardia Community College located in Long Island City, Queens, was founded in 1971 as a bold experiment in opening the doors of higher education to all, and we proudly carry forward that legacy today. LaGuardia educates students through over 50 degree, certificate and continuing education programs, providing an inspiring place for students to achieve their dreams. Upon graduation, LaGuardia students’ lives are transformed as family income increases 17%, and students transfer to four-year colleges at three times the national average. Part of the City University of New York (CUNY), LaGuardia is a nationally recognized leader among community colleges for boundary-breaking success educating underserved students. At LaGuardia we imagine new ideas, create new curriculum and pioneer programs to make our community and our country stronger. Visit www.laguardia.edu to learn more.

    ###

     Dr. Michael Baston of LAGCC Lays Out His Vision of College Student Transfer

    Dr. Michael Baston of LaGuardia Community College Lays Out His Vision of

    College Student Transfer at the NYS Transfer and Articulation Association

     

    Conference Held May 19-21 in Saratoga Springs

     

    Long Island City,NY—April 15, 2014—Dr. Michael Baston, vice president for Student Affairs and Enrollment Management at LaGuardia Community College, will be presenting a far-reaching proposal on how to build a comprehensive transfer continuum at the New York State Transfer and Articulation Association conference on May 19-21.

     

    This year’s conference theme is “Tracking Transfers…The Race to Graduate,” an especially relevant topic at a time when the local and national focus on graduation rates of college students.  “The transfer student population cannot be held behind in this conversation,” said Rebecca Mark, president of NYSTAA. 

     

    In his 90-minute interactive speech, which will include PowerPoint, videos and data, Mr. Baston will spell out his plan for two different transfer populations: community college students who have aspirations of transferring to a four-year institution upon graduation; and students who are facing academic challenges at a four-year college and decide to transfer to a community college with the intent of gaining readmission to the senior college once they address their problems.

     

    Dr. Baston said that both populations now see obstacles in reaching their objectives.

     

    In the case of community college students, he noted that while many of those students intend on transferring to a four-year college, few community colleges address students’ transfer aspiration goals early in their experience.  “This prevents these students from building the profile that gives them the edge at getting into the institution of their choice,” he said.

     

    For a student who transfers to a community college from a senior college, Dr. Baston said that oftentimes they do not have a clear pathway back to the institution that dismissed them and made an initial investment in recruitment dollars.

     

    To remedy the concerns about community college student transfer, the vice president sees student affairs professionals, particularly advisors and admission directors, playing a key role in guiding their students through the transfer process.

     

    “Student affairs professionals that work with transfer students can ensure that students attain their goals, complete their degrees and contribute to the nation’s intellectual talent pool,” he said.

     

    In the case of students transferring to community colleges to hone their skills before reapplying to their senior colleges, Dr. Baston envisions the establishment of community college-senior college partnerships that would ensure a seamless transfer.  “This is a win-win for both colleges and students,” he said.  “Through these collaborations, a student transferring to a community college would get the remediation and support they need to succeed at their senior college.  When they return, the senior college does not lose the investment, but actually gets a return on investment.”

     

    However, Dr. Baston added that a student who does not return to his or her senior college not only impacts their future earnings, but also their contributions to the city and state coffers.

     

    “While individuals miss out on future earnings,” he said, “the nation suffers a loss in revenue from future taxpayers as well, thereby affecting the very system that is constructed to help them attain a high-quality education.”

       

    •    •     •     •

     

    LaGuardia Community College located in Long Island City, Queens, was founded in 1971 as a bold experiment in opening the doors of higher education to all, and we proudly carry forward that legacy today. LaGuardia educates students through over 50 degree, certificate and continuing education programs, providing an inspiring place for students to achieve their dreams. Upon graduation, LaGuardia students’ lives are transformed as family income increases 17%, and students transfer to four-year colleges at three times the national average. Part of the City University of New York (CUNY), LaGuardia is a nationally recognized leader among community colleges for boundary-breaking success educating underserved students. At LaGuardia we imagine new ideas, create new curriculum and pioneer programs to make our community and our country stronger. Visit www.laguardia.edu to learn more.

     

    ###

     LAGCC Professor Receives CUNY Award for Research of Drug Discovery Methods

    LaGuardia Community College Professor Receives Prestigious CUNY Award for

    His Research in the Development of Computational Drug Discovery Methods

     

    Ian

    Long Island City,NY—April 14, 2014—Dr. Ian Alberts, a LaGuardia Community College chemistry professor, received the highly coveted Feliks Gross Award from the City University of New York’s Academy of Humanities and Sciences for his potentially groundbreaking research on computer-aided drug design.

     

    Dr. Alberts was the only community college professor among the six assistant professors to be awarded in recognition of their outstanding research in the humanities or sciences. 

     

    “Dr. Alberts is one of the new bright stars in our department,” Dr. Burl Yearwood, the chairperson of the Natural Sciences Department, said at the formal awards ceremony held on April 3.  “His research in the area of computer-aided drug design demonstrates his expertise in applying computational methods to significant scientific problems of chemical and biological importance.”

     

    Upon receiving the award, the LaGuardia professor, said, “It is a great honor to receive the award because it is based on my contributions to the field of research.  And it is very important, as a faculty member at LaGuardia, to advance ones scholarly research activities.”

     

    Since joining the Natural Science Department three years ago, Dr. Alberts is continuing his decade-long exploration into the power of the computer to develop novel and effective medicines to combat various types of cancer conditions, inflammatory-based diseases and neuropsychotic disorders.

     

    “The advantage of using these computation methods is that we can design new medicines that are more potent toward the therapeutic target,” he said.  “The methods also minimize the adverse side effects, which are the major cause of drugs failing in clinical trials.”

     

    Dr. Albert is conducing his state-of-the-art drug design program on a sophisticated 3-D computer graphics system.  Helping in the research, are two LaGuardia students who are applying their mentor’s methodology toward the development of anti-psychotic medication.  “They have come up with some interesting compounds,” he said.

     

    Also helping to move the research along are collaborations Dr. Albert established with research groups at Lehman College and Hunter College.  At Lehman, the LaGuardia professor is partnering with the computational group to look at the incorporation of solvation effects into the drug design process.  It is then the job of the synthetic chemistry group at Hunter to synthesize and test the effectiveness of the predicted new drug compounds.

     

    Currently, LaGuardia and Lehman have applied their methodology and designed a potential, new antipsychotic drug that is being tested at Hunter.  “This outstanding collaboration between three CUNY colleges is the reason why the research is going so well,” said Dr. Alberts, who added that if the results are positive they will be applying for additional federal funding. 

     

    When Dr. Alberts is not in the classroom or the lab, the assistant professor is collaborating with a LaGuardia mathematics professor in the area of quantum computing, developing hybrid chemistry courses and organizing math skill workshops for students in STEM and health science to improve their math skills as they take science and nursing courses.

     

    Dr. Alberts joined LaGuardia after working in the pharmaceutical industry for 10 years.  At De Novo Pharmaceuticals in England and Schrödinger in New York, he was a principal scientist and led research teams focused on the development and application of state-of-the-art methodology for computational drug discovery. 

     

    He received his BS in Chemistry from the University of Manchester, England, and his Ph.D. in Theoretical Chemistry from the University of Cambridge, England.  He conducted postdoctoral research at the University of Georgia.

       

    •    •     •     •

     

    LaGuardia Community College located in Long Island City, Queens, was founded in 1971 as a bold experiment in opening the doors of higher education to all, and we proudly carry forward that legacy today. LaGuardia educates students through over 50 degree, certificate and continuing education programs, providing an inspiring place for students to achieve their dreams. Upon graduation, LaGuardia students’ lives are transformed as family income increases 17%, and students transfer to four-year colleges at three times the national average. Part of the City University of New York (CUNY), LaGuardia is a nationally recognized leader among community colleges for boundary-breaking success educating underserved students. At LaGuardia we imagine new ideas, create new curriculum and pioneer programs to make our community and our country stronger. Visit www.laguardia.edu to learn more.

     

    ###

     LAGCC Celebrates its 8th Annual Earth Day on April 29 - May1

    LaGuardia Community College Celebrates its 8th Annual
    Earth Day with “Green” Festivities on April 29 – May 1
    The Event is Free and Open to thePublic


    Green

     

    Long Island City, NY—April 14, 2014—Eight years and counting, LaGuardia Community College’s “green” efforts continue to grow as our annual Earth Day celebration approaches.  The Sustainability Council and its supporters are hosting a three-day event beginning April 29 that will center on this years theme, “Engineering Sustainable Solutions.”  The event is free and open to the public.

     

    This year’s kick-off event will engage employees in a 5K fun run/walk for the environment.  The group excursion will provide runners with scenic views along Long Island City Park.  Employees will meet at noon on Tuesday, April 29 and make their way to the park—returning to LaGuardia.  Green LaGuardia headbands will be given to participants of the walk/run for their efforts in caring for the environment.

     

    The 8th annual Earth Day celebration will take place in the College’s E-Atrium on Wednesday, April 30.  The tabling event will run from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. and feature academic and administrative departments, including LaGuardia’s Departments of Mathematics, Engineering and Computer Science and the Natural Sciences.  The Sustainability Council will set-up an eco footprint calculating exercise where students can enter a raffle to win: t-shirts and folders with this year’s logo designed by LaGuardia alumnus Fulmer Duckworth, aluminum water bottles, cell phone plugs and more.  A local farmers’ market will offer the College community organic produce from Long Island.

     

    Green Week’s events for May 1 are as follows:

     

    “People, Profits and Planet: The Triple Bottom Line” in room E-111 from 10:30 a.m. to 12:00 p.m. Lee Boyar, professor at LaGuardia’s Business and Technology Department, will present his teachings on sustainability in business.


    The Japanese Club will co-sponsor a screening of the 1971 classic “Godzilla vs. Hedorah (the Smog Monster),” at 2:30 p.m.  A panel discussion, about pollution led by Judith O’Toole, chemical hygiene officer and the English department’s Sigmund Chen, will follow. 


    Green Week’s first ever Artists’ Café, where students, faculty and staff are encouraged to share their artwork on the Freedom Wall installation, will conclude the Thursday event and end at 4:30 p.m.  Food will be provided, as well as a raffle where students can enter to win a Nook.


    On May 2, courtesy of Metro Shine, sustainable car washes will be offered in the College’s parking lot at a discounted rate.   

     

    Please share in LaGuardia’s “green” movement to live a happier, more sustainable life.

     

    For more information, on LaGuardia’s Earth Day, please call (718) 482-5772.

     

    •     •     •     •

     

    LaGuardia Community College located in Long Island City, Queens, was founded in 1971 as a bold experiment in opening the doors of higher education to all, and we proudly carry forward that legacy today. LaGuardia educates students through over 50 degree, certificate and continuing education programs, providing an inspiring place for students to achieve their dreams. Upon graduation, LaGuardia students’ lives are transformed as family income increases 17%, and students transfer to four-year colleges at three times the national average. Part of the City University of New York (CUNY), LaGuardia is a nationally recognized leader among community colleges for boundary-breaking success educating underserved students. At LaGuardia we imagine new ideas, create new curriculum and pioneer programs to make our community and our country stronger. Visit www.laguardia.edu to learn more.

     

    ###

     LAGCC Math Team Takes First Place in Regional Math Competition

    LaGuardia Community College Math Team Takes First Place in Regional Mathematics Competition


    math pic

    Long Island City,NY—April 11, 2014—A team of LaGuardia Community College students displayed its mastery of math and problem solving and took first prize among community college teams at the Eleventh Annual Garden State Undergraduate Mathematics Competition for two-year and four-year colleges.


    The three students making up the team, Yongnian Nie, a civil engineering major; Patrick Older, an electrical engineering major; and Michael Vindiola, liberal arts: math and science major, also bested 19 senior college teams from New York, New Jersey and Pennsylvania, placing the team in the top 40 percent.  Thirty-two colleges entered the competition, which was organized by the Mathematical Association of America and was held on April 5 at Rowan University.
     

    “This was quite an achievement for our students who found themselves not only competing against community colleges,” said Professor Reem Jaafar, one of the faculty advisors, “but also against four-year institutions, including Stonybrook College, SUNY; Rutgers College; and Temple University.” 


    The Math Society members prepare for the two-hour exam that comprised interesting problems covering combinatorics, calculus, number theory and other topics.  Professor Nader Goubran spent several hours training the students.


    “I am very proud of students,” said Professor Goubran.  “This competition was more difficult than previous ones.  Our students attended because of the strength of our adversaries, which included some of the top schools in math.”


    Patrick noted that the questions were tough, but not unmanageable.  “I definitely plan on attending the next event this fall,” he said. 


    “Our performance shows that LaGuardia students can compete against four-year college students,” said Yongnian.  “I hope that LaGuardia further develops its Math Society and attracts more students so that students like me, Patrick and Michael can realize their potential in mathematics.”


    Getting to the competition at the New Jersey college proved to be the first test for the students and their three faculty advisors, Professors Jaafar, Goubran and Shenglan Yuan.  Dr. Jaafar had to rent a minivan and the group met her in Lower Manhattan at 7 a.m. to embark on the two-hour trip to the New Jersey campus. The group arrived just in time for the students to sit down for the exam.


    While the students were solving problems, the three faculty advisors were busy judging posters and presiding over sessions.


    Entering the competition was part of the Mathematics Department’s Maximizing Mathematics Achievement (MAA) funded by a TENSOR-SUMMA grant from MAA and support from the Division of Academic Affairs.


    “The MaxiMA directors,” said Professor Yuan, “will continue to foster student research as well as build a math community with student talks, faculty-led math talks, field trips and student problem solving sessions for national and regional math contests.”


    •     •     •     •


    LaGuardia Community College located in Long Island City, Queens, was founded in 1971 as a bold experiment in opening the doors of higher education to all, and we proudly carry forward that legacy today. LaGuardia educates students through over 50 degree, certificate and continuing education programs, providing an inspiring place for students to achieve their dreams. Upon graduation, LaGuardia students’ lives are transformed as family income increases 17%, and students transfer to four-year colleges at three times the national average. Part of the City University of New York (CUNY), LaGuardia is a nationally recognized leader among community colleges for boundary-breaking success educating underserved students. At LaGuardia we imagine new ideas, create new curriculum and pioneer programs to make our community and our country stronger. Visit www.laguardia.edu to learn more.


    ###

     LAGCC Student Wins First Prize for Research on the Ground Spider

    LaGuardia Community College Student Takes First Prize in a National Competition for Her Research on the Ground Spider


     

    Jar of spiders pic 


    Long Island City, NY—April 11, 2014— Amanda Tsang, a LaGuardia Community College student, placed first at the Sigma Xi Research Showcase, a nationwide online science competition, for her research project that is tracing the evolution of the ground spider, one of the largest but little researched spider families.

    Amanda and Dr. Boris Zakharov, her faculty mentor, are looking at the evolution of the ground spider by examining the setae, the hair-like structures on the spider’s abdomen.   The ground spider, also known as the family of Gnaphosidae, is the seventh largest family of spiders, with 2,162 described species in 122 genera distributed worldwide.

    “Previous studies found that setae vary among ground spiders and may give researchers cues for their classification on the generic and subfamily level, however these microstructures and their variations across the family are still not known,” said Amanda, “Our goal was to look at these spider hairs and understand how we can see the evolution of these different spider groups through the kinds of hairs they have.  The idea is that genera that are closer to each other from an evolutionary standpoint will have similar types of setae.”

    To reach its goal, the team, for the past six months, conducted research at the American Museum of Natural History, home of a large spider collection.   Amanda was responsible for preparing the spiders for review, a long process that entailed desiccating the spider using a freeze-drying technique.  The spiders were then mounted on a slide so that the body parts could be viewed under a scanning electron microscope.

    After examining some 30 specimens, Amanda noted that the findings demonstrated that each genus of ground spider has a distinct type of setae.   “More research into spider setae may help us better understand their evolution,” she added.

    The research is described in a video that Amanda produced for the competition.  Line drawings illustrate some of the different forms setae takes: common forms of setae include plumose setae, which are feather-like hairs; and simple squamous setae, which are flat and scale-like hairs.  Following are images showing some of the distinct types of setae in several genera.  For example, spiders of the Anzacia genus have squamous setae with brachia, or branches, close to the root; and the spiders of the Berlandina genus have plumose setae with flattened brachia from the bottom to top of the stem. 

    Several of the species that the research team looked at had never before been described in terms of their setae.

    The judges quizzed the young researher on her research and came away very impressed.  “It was nice to receive the recognition,” said Amanda, who received the first prize in Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, in the undergraduate section.

    Dr. Zakharov said he was a little surprised over the attention the research received.  “We are involved in traditional research that focuses on anatomy and physiology,” he said.  “It is not a hot topic like DNA, but it is nice to know that many people are interested in basic, fundamental research.” 

    He went on the say, “The research on the ground spider is very important because they are one of the most diverse and numerous groups, and they play a very significant role in the ecosystem.” 

    Amanda noted that they plan on continuing the long research process with the hope of examining the 122 genera in the family.  “In another year we hope to be able to construct the complete phylogenic tree of the ghaphosid genera,” she said.  

    While the 27-year old is examining setae, she will be taking the pre-requisite science courses required for admission to a physician assistance program.  When Amanda enrolled at LaGuardia in the fall of 2013 she already had a BA in Psychology from the University of Michigan and a MPH in Epidemiology from Columbia University.  

    After graduating from Columbia, she landed a job as a research coordinator, but was not happy with where her career path was heading.  “I soon realized that my real passion was clinical work and decided that a physician assistant degree was the right thing to do,” she said.

    She said that LaGuardia is helping her prepare for her next academic move. “The courses are rigorous and I love my professors,” she said.  “And the research has been an added plus.”

    “Amanda has discovered that LaGuardia is not only an institution that can provide her a challenging academic experience that will fully prepare her for any physician assistant program she enters,” said Dr. Gail O. Mellow, president of LaGuardia,” but  it is also enriching her experience with serious research that she would not find at another community college.”

    •    •     •     •


    About LaGuardia Community College:
    LaGuardia Community College located in Long Island City, Queens, was founded in 1971 as a bold experiment in opening the doors of higher education to all, and we proudly carry forward that legacy today. LaGuardia educates students through over 50 degree, certificate and continuing education programs, providing an inspiring place for students to achieve their dreams. Upon graduation, LaGuardia students’ lives are transformed as family income increases 17%, and students transfer to four-year colleges at three times the national average. Part of the City University of New York (CUNY), LaGuardia is a nationally recognized leader among community colleges for boundary-breaking success educating underserved students. At LaGuardia we imagine new ideas, create new curriculum and pioneer programs to make our community and our country stronger. Visit www.laguardia.edu to learn more.

    About Sigma Xi:
    Founded in 1886, Sigma Xi, The Scientific Research Society is a non-profit membership society of nearly 60,000 scientists and engineers belonging to more than 500 Sigma Xi chapters at universities and colleges, government laboratories and industry research centers.

    ###

     10,000 Small Businesses Provides Missing Ingredient
    10,000 Small Businesses Provides Missing Ingredient: A Good Plan 
     
    My cake 

    Long Island City, NY—April 4, 2014—While growth was not a problem for Aliyyah Baylor’s specialty cake business, not having a solid plan was.

    “Growth can stop you from seeing your business from the outside and working on it because there’s not a plan in place,” said the owner of Make My Cake in Harlem. “But starting the day off with goals and a plan is so important.”

    When Ms. Baylor’s mother decided to use her long-ago earned college degree to venture into the corporate world and in turn close her 15-year-old home-run cake business, Ms. Baylor made the choice to take over, transferring from North Carolina A & T State University, where she was a food science major, to CUNY’s NYC College of Technology.

    “Customers were still calling the house, so I decided to transfer to New York and continue the business,” she said. However, majoring in hospitality and food management while running a busy cake business was challenging for the young entrepreneur. “They believed in my mom, so the clientele was easy to bring over,” asserted Ms. Baylor. “I just had to convince myself that I could do it. I had to get to a certain level of maturity very quickly. Thankfully, my mother had taught me to take responsibility.”

    Her hard work paid off. Within four years, she was able to open a retail shop at 110th St. and Lenox Ave. in Harlem. A second shop was opened at 23-80 Adam Clayton Powell Blvd. and 139th St. in 1999. In 2006, she relocated the 110th St./Lenox Ave. shop to 121 St. Nicholas Ave. and 116th St. and currently runs the two Harlem storefronts.

    After opening the first retail shop in 1996, Ms. Baylor began to zero in on specialty cakes with wedding cakes as a separate category. “I’ve learned that not every idea is a business. You come up with a gazillion ideas, but what you have to focus on is the one thing that’s going to be your core business. But going through the whole gamut is part of growing your business,” she explained. Over the years, she has added southern cakes, pastries, pies and cookies to the menu, but cakes remain the heart of her business.

    “Company growth happens really fast. There’s no thought process of working on the business; you’re always in the business,” Ms. Baylor noted. So in 2011, when she learned from an associate about Goldman Sachs 10,000 Small Businesses at LaGuardia Community College, a national program that helps small businesses grow and create jobs through greater access to business education, financial capital, and support services, she knew it was for her. “The program came at the most opportune time, when I was asking myself, ‘Where do I take the business next?’ ” she said.

    What she learned immediately from the program was that a growth plan is key. “It’s important to know what your goals are for your business, and as you map that out it gets easier,” said Ms. Baylor. “Since the program, I’ve been able to take a breath and not be so anxious. I can watch some things happen.”

    Some of those things have been revenue growth of 31%, and hiring six new full time employees and two new seasonal/part time employees. Part of her growth plan—which every 10,000 Small Businesses scholar must complete—was to purchase a delivery/vending truck. She accomplished this goal less than a year after completing the program and debuted the truck at the 2013 Presidential Inauguration in Washington, D.C.

    And with actress Tina Fey as a loyal customer, Make My Cake was written into the script of the series finale of the NBC sitcom “30 Rock” last spring. “We’ve gotten a phenomenal response to that feature. Tourists and locals have walked in to see the photo on the wall of Tina Fey. And neighborhood people who said they had always just walked by came in after the show and are now clients,” Ms. Baylor said.

    Another benefit of the program has been the camaraderie she has experienced not only with her fellow classmates and those of other cohorts, but also from the staff, in particular the business advisors. Pointing out that graduates are in touch constantly for networking or even jobs—a graduate from a later cohort is redesigning her web site—she noted, “It’s overwhelming the gratitude I feel towards the advisors; I’ve never been exposed to that level of commitment before. They’re so accessible and concerned about what we’re doing next.”

    Looking ahead, Ms. Baylor has worked on her plan quite a bit. Future aspirations include making specialty cakes for restaurants, especially to capitalize on the many new restaurants opening in Harlem; increasing delivery into all New York City boroughs as well as New Jersey; getting the mail order business off the ground for cupcakes, cheesecake and cookies; and creating a product line that would include icings, among other things. She also wants to set up the new truck at fairs and festivals in different areas to open up new markets.

    “These goals are doable,” she said. “These are all ideas I came up with in the program, while working on my plan. The program helped me figure out what I need to do first in order to reach these goals.”

    To learn more about Goldman Sachs 10,000 Small Businesses at LaGuardia Community College:
     

    • • • •


    Goldman Sachs 10,000 Small Businesses is an initiative to unlock the growth and job creation potential of 10,000 small businesses across the United States through greater access to business education, financial capital, and business support services. The program operates through a national network of public and private partner organizations including community colleges, business schools and Community Development Financial Institutions. The initiative is currently active in New York, Chicago, Cleveland, Houston, Long Beach, Los Angeles, New Orleans, and Salt Lake City and will continue to expand to communities across the country. Community partners in New York City include The City of New York, LaGuardia Community College and Seedco Financial Services.

    LaGuardia Community College located in Long Island City, Queens, was founded in 1971 as a bold experiment in opening the doors of higher education to all, and we proudly carry forward that legacy today. LaGuardia educates students through over 50 degree, certificate and continuing education programs, providing an inspiring place for students to achieve their dreams. Upon graduation, LaGuardia students’ lives are transformed as family income increases 17%, and students transfer to four-year colleges at three times the national average. Part of the City University of New York (CUNY), LaGuardia is a nationally recognized leader among community colleges for boundary-breaking success educating underserved students. At LaGuardia we imagine new ideas, create new curriculum and pioneer programs to make our community and our country stronger. Visit www.laguardia.edu to learn more.

     

    ###
     Small Business Owners Green Store Sprouts
     Small Business Owners Green Store Sprouts After Completing 10,000 Small Businesses at LaGuardia Community College  
    Elissa
    Long Island City, NY—April 2, 2014—Elissa Olin, an actor-turned-aspiring-small-business-owner would walk around her Brooklyn neighborhood including Bed-Stuy and Clinton Hill with her dog, Lola, passing storefronts and imagining opening one herself. She envisioned an eco-friendly home goods and gift shop that would provide green products to a working class neighborhood where shopping and resources were limited.

    "As I wandered through my neighborhood, I thought about what Horace Mann, the founder of my alma mater, Antioch College, had said: Be ashamed to die until you have won some victory for humanity. At that time the work I was doing felt counter to his dictum. I thought by opening a shop that helped make it easy and convenient to live a greener life, Id be able to contribute to my neighborhood and become a more active part of my community. It was a way to make a positive difference," said Ms. Olin.

    Within 13 months of hatching her idea, Ms. Olin took a course to develop a much-needed business plan, discovered a vacant storefront on Myrtle Avenue that would be a perfect space for a small store and received approval and an affordable rent for the space. And on Earth Day 2009, April 22, Green in BKLYN -- a one-stop shop for people who are striving to attain a greener home and life -- opened its doors.

    "Doing everything in such a short time - it was definitely a wild ride," she said.

    Now, almost five years old, the store is everything the small business owner envisaged. Customers walk into an inviting, friendly shop, where she is there to greet them with a warm hello or a congenial employee is at the ready to assist and answer questions. And Lola is there to welcome the patrons and their four-legged companions.

    The wood shelves are stocked with a wide array of sustainable, eco-friendly home goods and gifts ranging from recycled paper goods to organic beauty products to coffees, teas and chocolates. Many of the items carried are produced by Brooklyn companies: cotton kitchen towels made by a woman who lives around the corner from the store; jars of local honey provided by a local beekeeper; chocolates walked over from the local factory; and two lines of cleaning products made right in the neighborhood. Also sold are books, greeting cards, jewelry, solar powered products, pet supplies and children's toys many of which are also from local companies.

    The store, which is offering a greener lifestyle to its customers, has established a niche in the neighborhood, has expanded its inventory and has increased its revenue, but Ms. Olin admits that during the first few years the demands placed on her as a fledgling small business owner were taking its toll. Being the sole employee meant working six days a week leaving her little time to do anything else. And when she was finally able to hire staff they did not prove to be the right fit. She also was not certain she had control of her finances.

    "I didnt think I was making good decisions regarding staffing and financial matters and I wasnt managing my time properly," she said. "I realized in order to successfully grow my business, I had to learn how to run it more effectively, how to make sound decisions and how to be a stronger leader."

    Enter Goldman Sachs 10,000 Small Businesses, a collaboration between Goldman Sachs and LaGuardia Community College, which provides entrepreneurs with the tools and knowledge they need to help grow their business. The program teaches a specially developed curriculum that covers every aspect of business that is vital to a small business owners survival accounting; marketing and selling; negotiating; hiring, developing and retaining talented employees; and organizing a growth plan.

    In the summer of 2012, Ms. Olin enrolled in the free intensive business program at LaGuardia and for 11 weeks engaged in a variety of activities that provided her with a wealth of knowledge.

    One assignment in particular creating her growth plan proved to be invaluable. "By sitting down and refining my original business plan into a growth plan," she said, "I was able to clarify my mission and vision, and, by doing that, I was able to address one of my main concerns: how to hire the right people."

    She went on to say, "I realized that when it came to hiring I have to bring in people who embody the culture of the business since a big part of why customers return to the store is because they appreciate its warm, relaxed atmosphere."

    Ms. Olin currently has three part-time employees who were originally customers and neighborhood residents and one local student intern. Im not only able to give people who live in the neighborhood jobs, but now Im hiring people who also believe in the mission and want to be a part of it, she said.

    Now that she has hired competent staff, Ms. Olin has the freedom to spend four days in the store and the other three directing her energies to growing her business. She attends gift and craft fairs in search of new product lines; posts information on social media sites; focuses more attention on updating her website; and is working toward selling products online. She also publishes a monthly newsletter that is distributed to over 5,000 customers and, with a better understanding and management of her finances, is making more effective financial decisions.

    "I loved being in the store, but 10,000 Small Businesses taught me how to be a better CEO - one who concentrates on hiring more people, creating more opportunities and successfully growing the business."

    And grown it has. Since taking the program, sales have increased 20% and she plans on hiring additional staff as well as expand into on-line sales. She has become a self-declared ambassador spreading the word about the program.

    "I've told every small business owner I know to take the program," said Ms. Olin who added that so far two people have followed her advice and entered the program. "I told them, It'll change everything - it'll change your business and it'll change your life."

    To learn more about the Goldman Sachs 10,000 Small Businesses initiative at LaGuardia Community College:

    Visit www.laguardia.edu/10ksb

    Call our team at (718) 730-7400

    Email 10KSB@lagcc.cuny.edu

    • • • • 

    Goldman Sachs 10,000 Small Businesses is an initiative to unlock the growth and job creation potential of 10,000 small businesses across theUnited States through greater access to business education, financial capital, and business support services. The program operates through a national network of public and private partner organizations including community colleges, business schools and Community Development FinancialInstitutions. The initiative is currently active in New York, Chicago, Cleveland, Houston, Long Beach, Los Angeles, New Orleans, and Salt Lake City and will continue to expand to communities across the country. Community partners in New YorkCity include The City of New York, LaGuardia Community College and Seedco Financial Services.

    LaGuardia Community College located in Long Island City, Queens, was founded in 1971 as a bold experiment in opening the doors of higher education to all, and we proudly carry forward that legacy today. LaGuardia educates students through over 50 degree, certificate and continuing education programs, providing an inspiring place for students to achieve their dreams. Upon graduation, LaGuardia students lives are transformed as family income increases 17%, and students transfer to four-year colleges at three times the national average. Part of the City University of New York (CUNY), LaGuardia is a nationally recognized leader among community colleges for boundary-breaking success educating underserved students. At LaGuardia we imagine new ideas, create new curriculum and pioneer programs to make our community and our country stronger. Visit www.laguardia.edu to learn more.

    ###



     LAGCC Hosts the CUNY Latina Cultural Studies Conference
     LaGuardia Community College Hosts the 
    CUNY Latin@ Cultural Studies Conference on April 25

    Long Island City, NY—April 2, 2014—Ernesto Quiñonez, a nationally acclaimed American novelist, and Suzanne Oboler, an author and professor of Latin American and Latina/o Studies at John Jay College of Criminal Justice, on April 25 will deliver keynote addresses at the CUNY Latin@ Cultural Studies Conference hosted by LaGuardia Community College and the CUNY Latino Faculty Initiative.

    The one-day conference, which will also feature panel discussions that cover a full range of topics, will spotlight the work of faculty, students and community members who study Latino/a fields such as border poetics, exile, the politics of race, sexuality and gender as well as literature, media-making, visual arts and film.

    This conference aims to ignite an interdisciplinary conversation among members of CUNY and the community about the role of Latino/a literature, art, film, performance and media in local and global processes of change.

    The conference, which begins at 9:00 a.m., will be held in LaGuardia’s E-building at 31-10 Thomson Avenue, Long Island City.   For more information, please email cunylatinoculturalstudies@gmail.com or visit the website at http://lagcc-cuny.digication.com/cuny_latino_cultural_studies_conference.

    Dr. Oboler is the founding editor of “Latino Studies,” (2002-12) and author of numerous books, chapters and articles. She has edited “Latinos and Citizenship: The Dilemma of Belonging; Behind Bars: Latino/as and Prison in the United States,” (2006); and co-edited “Neither Enemies nor Friends: Latinos, Blacks, Afro-Latinos” (2009). She is co-editor-in-chief of “The Oxford Encyclopedia of Latino/as in the United States” and “The Oxford Encyclopedia of Latinos and Latinas in Contemporary Politics, Law and Social Movements.”

    Mr. Quiñonez is a graduate of City College and an associate professor of creative writing at Cornell University. His first novel, “Bodega Dreams,” has become a landmark in contemporary literature. The New York Times declared the book “a new immigrant classic,” and it received a Best Book designation by the Times and the Los Angeles Times. It was also chosen as a Barnes & Noble Discover Great New Writers title as well as a Borders Bookstore Original New Voice selection.

    His second novel, “Chango’s Fire,” also received critical acclaim. Kirkus Reviews hailed the author’s “ingeniously detailed revelations of how people cheat and improvise to survive in an impoverished and dangerous racist environment. This is an author who knows his material.”

    Also scheduled is a dramatic reading of work by Carlos Serrano, a 1993 graduate of Brooklyn College’s BFA Creative Writing Program and a member of the People’s Theatre Project’s resident playwrights unit and its literary manager. While at Brooklyn College, Mr. Serrano received the college’s Irwin Shaw Award in playwriting and the Grabanier Drama Award.

    Mr. Serrano’s play, “No Better Friend, No Worse Enemy,” (“No Hay Mejor Amigo, Ni Peor Enemigo”) was recently in production at Repertorio Español. His other playwriting credits include: “Hold: A Requiem For A Bride,” “24 Hours at Tiempo,” “A Day a Mariachi Band followed Charlie Home,” “Charlie Needs a Shrink,” “Not Just Another Puerto Rican Love Story,” “The Blues of Daisy Peña” and “Alter Ego.”

    The panel discussions examine a panoply of timely topics:
    • “Recent Reconsiderations on Puerto Rican Identity at the Center of Puerto Rican Studies”
    • “The Cultural Politics of Latina/o Multimedia and Theatre”
    • “Global Circuits of Latina/o and Latin American Cultures”
    • “Radio Ambulante and Emerging Latina/o Poetry”
    • “Latina/o Diasporic Subjects”
    • “Arts and Politics: Uneasy Partners”
    • “Teaching Latin@ Cultural Studies at CUNY”
    • “Media, Politics and Borders”
    • “Building a Movement Through Culture”
    • “Negotiating the Self in Latina/o Narrative”


    • • • •

    LaGuardia Community College located in Long Island City, Queens, was founded in 1971 as a bold experiment in opening the doors of higher education to all, and we proudly carry forward that legacy today. LaGuardia educates students through over 50 degree, certificate and continuing education programs, providing an inspiring place for students to achieve their dreams. Upon graduation, LaGuardia students’ lives are transformed as family income increases 17%, and students transfer to four-year colleges at three times the national average. Part of the City University of New York (CUNY), LaGuardia is a nationally recognized leader among community colleges for boundary-breaking success educating underserved students. At LaGuardia we imagine new ideas, create new curriculum and pioneer programs to make our community and our country stronger. Visit www.laguardia.edu to learn more.

    ###

     LAGCC Communication Studies Department Hosts Speech Professors
     LaGuardia Community College’s Communication Studies Department 
    Hosts CUNY League of Active Speech Professors 

    Keynote Address by Communication Scholar Dr. Julia Wood 


    Long Island City, NY—April 2, 2014—Dr. Julia Wood, a leading scholar in the field of communication studies, delivered an enlightening keynote address exploring how communication plays an important role in enriching the quality of our lives, at the LaGuardia Communication Studies Program and CUNY League of Active Speech Professors conference.

    The keynote speaker was the headliner at the March 28th conference, titled “Can Anyone Hear Me?” where LaGuardia and other CUNY communication studies professors showcased their current research and practice in the field with a focus on the intersections of communication studies and other disciplines.

    In her talk, Dr. Wood took the audience back 2,500 years to the birth of communication and on to the present where communication scholars are grappling with some of the most important issues facing our society.

    “The communication field has adapted to the ever-changing landscape of our society so that it is continually relevant to our individual and collective lives,” Dr. Wood said to the CUNY faculty and students who participated in the event hosted by LaGuardia.

    She spoke at length on three issues that communication scholars are continuously dealing with: sexual harassment, violence between intimates and the effects of social media on our lives.

    In looking at sexual harassment, a pervasive problem on college campuses and the work place that affects both women and men, Dr. Wood explained that scholars are conducting research on the dynamics of sexual harassment: how it happens, how it is sustained, why people do not speak up when they are harassed and why by-standers do not speak up. “This work has given us ideas on how to reduce sexual harassment,” she said.

    In touching upon another alarming, widespread problem--violence between intimates--she shared her research on violent romantic relationships. “Through my interviews with women in violent relationships, the stories showed me that broad social narratives about gender and romance shape their understanding of their own relationship,” she said. “As long as they believed that good women do not leave their men, love will conquer all.”

    Her study also included men who were in prison for hurting or killing their wives or girlfriends. “They, too, are victims of a cultural code of conduct,” said Dr. Wood.

    The speaker said that scholars are also in the forefront of exploring the ways in which social media affect, for good or ill, our identities, our relationships, our work and the civil society as a whole. For example, she said a big focus is being placed on cyberbullying and how young women are using blogs and other forms of social media to resist social pressures.

    Dr. Wood said that communication scholars and teachers will continue to do what they always do. “They will enlarge understanding and equip people with the skills to be effective in the various spheres of life,” she said. “That is why this field allows us to continually imagine and remake the possibilities for how we live, work and participate in our collective communities.”

    The conference also held a host of panel discussions that examined the field’s research and practice in a changing communication landscape. Professor Patricia Sokolski, a LaGuardia communication studies professor, chaired a panel including LaGuardia professors Janet Michello, social science; and Lisa Barry, communication studies, which examined research in the field.

    Joining the panel discussion on teaching communication in an online environment, were LaGuardia communication studies professor, Louis Lucca, who chaired the panel, and professors Kimberly Ramirez, English; Robert Bruno, communication studies; and Erika Heppner, communication studies.

    A discussion on oral communication across the curriculum included LaGuardia professors, Habiba Boumlik, education and language acquisition; Reem Jaafar, mathematics; Sean Palmer, communication studies; and Thomas Regan, communication studies.

    LaGuardia professors Leslie Aarons, philosophy; and Boris Zakhorav, natural sciences, participated in a panel discussion on research with special populations. And Jetmir Troshani, of instructional services, participated in a discussion on technology in the service of communication.

     

    • • • •


    LaGuardia Community College located in Long Island City, Queens, was founded in 1971 as a bold experiment in opening the doors of higher education to all, and we proudly carry forward that legacy today. LaGuardia educates students through over 50 degree, certificate and continuing education programs, providing an inspiring place for students to achieve their dreams. Upon graduation, LaGuardia students’ lives are transformed as family income increases 17%, and students transfer to four-year colleges at three times the national average. Part of the City University of New York (CUNY), LaGuardia is a nationally recognized leader among community colleges for boundary-breaking success educating underserved students. At LaGuardia we imagine new ideas, create new curriculum and pioneer programs to make our community and our country stronger. Visit www.laguardia.edu to learn more.

     

    ###




     Three LaGuardia Mathematics Professors Receive National Science Foundation Grant

     

      Three LaGuardia Community College Mathematics Professors 
     Receive National Science Foundation Grant 

     
    National Science Foundation Grant Math Professors 

     

     
    Long Island City, NY—March 31, 2014—As part of a National Center for Science and Engagement initiative to link college-level mathematics to relevant civic issues, three LaGuardia Community College mathematics professors were awarded a three-year National Science Foundation grant to develop a statistics course that will place an emphasis on applications in civic and environmental issues.

    The professors, Dr. Prabha Betne, Dr. Milena Cuellar and Dr. Mangala Kothari, will develop a statistics course that will provide students with an opportunity to enhance their ability to describe how statistics is used in analyzing social and environmental problems. Students will also learn how to perform a statistical analysis and how to present their findings to a wider community.

    The team also plans on enhancing two basic math courses—Introduction to Algebra and Elementary Algebra—to improve students’ critical thinking and quantitative reasoning skills.

    “This project provides the team with the opportunity to create activities that will connect math to the real world,” said Dr. Kothari. “By making that connection, our students will understand how relevant math is in their everyday lives.”

    The initiative, titled “Engaging Mathematics: Creating a National Community of Practice,” applies the SENCER model, which links subject matter with issues of civic importance to math courses.

    LaGuardia, along with Metropolitan State University in St. Paul’s, Minnesota, are the lead institutions. Dr. Betne will serve as an advisory board member; Dr. Cuellar, as a faculty fellow; and Dr. Kothari, as a co-principal investigator.

    Other colleges participating in the program are Augsburg College in Minneapolis, Minnesota; Normandale Community College in Bloomington, Minnesota; Oglethorpe University in Atlanta, Georgia; and Roosevelt University in Chicago, Illinois. These six participants will form a community of practice by collaborating with each other.

    “This project brings math professors from two- and four-year institutions across the country to partner to enhance existing courses and develop new ones,” said Dr. Betne.

    “As mathematics educators, we have a responsibility to help develop leaders and decision-makers who are able to make good decisions informed by science and mathematics,” said Dr. Frank Wattenberg, a professor at the United States Military Academy and a co-principal investigator on the project.

    • • • •

    LaGuardia Community College located in Long Island City, Queens, was founded in 1971 as a bold experiment in opening the doors of higher education to all, and we proudly carry forward that legacy today. LaGuardia educates students through over 50 degree, certificate and continuing education programs, providing an inspiring place for students to achieve their dreams. Upon graduation, LaGuardia students’ lives are transformed as family income increases 17%, and students transfer to four-year colleges at three times the national average. Part of the City University of New York (CUNY), LaGuardia is a nationally recognized leader among community colleges for boundary-breaking success educating underserved students. At LaGuardia we imagine new ideas, create new curriculum and pioneer programs to make our community and our country stronger. Visit www.laguardia.edu to learn more.

     

     LaGuardia Alumni Discuss Transfer Tips for Selective Four-Year Institutions
     LaGuardia Alumni Discuss Transfer Tips for Selective Four-Year Institutions  
     
    HSAC 

       

    Long Island City, NY—January 29, 2014—LaGuardia Community College Honors Student Advisory Committee (HSAC) welcomed students for a discussion about transfer and campus resources at the Meet LaGuardia Alumni: A Winter Mingler event, where LaGuardia’s distinguished alumni shared their experiences on transferring to highly selective four-year institutions.

    Wai Lam, a member of HSAC, the student-run collective that coordinates peer-led transfer and scholarship workshops and projects that promote student research and civic engagement, began the event with a brief introduction to start the mingling session.

    “There is a lot of work you need to deal with during the transfer process like sending your recommendation letter two months earlier than the deadline,” said the Biology major who plans to apply to over 10 baccalaureate schools.

    “I’m quite pleased with the turnout of this event by the current students. Also, I’m extremely grateful to the alumni for making the time to come back and to connect with the current students,” said Dr. Karlyn Koh, Director of the Honors Program, about the 57 attendees.

    “It’s critical for students to connect with successful alumni so that they can have higher expectations of themselves.”

    Each of the ten alumni, including Sasheen Pottinger ’09, who attends Cornell University and Tashdid Hasan ’09 and Johnny Lee ’12 who both attend Columbia University, introduced themselves to the enthusiastic scholars who were engaged in enlightening conversations about writing personal statements, scholarship opportunities, and joining LaGuardia’s Honors Program. Every 15-minutes three to four alumni would move throughout the classroom to a different group each sharing their distinct perspectives.

    Frieda Raitelu ’13, former Class Representative who spoke at commencement, exemplified diligence and determination when she was accepted to Smith College as an Ada Comstock Scholar. She credits LaGuardia for her success. “I really believe in the spirit of giving back. I’m successful because of the support that I received from the staff, the faculty, the Development Office, and my peers who were going through the transfer process. I think you have to always reflect and be grateful. You do that by helping students explore their opportunities.”

    Freshman Saima Mazumder, a Childhood Education major, acquired knowledge about LaGuardia’s many opportunities and resources. Not only did she learn about the different transfer experiences, she also gained inspiration. “As a student here you feel very overwhelmed but when you see them you feel like it’s possible—you can do it too. I am definitely thinking of joining HSAC and taking Honors courses.”

    Dr. John Chaffee, Honors Program Senior Faculty Advisor and Director of the Philosophy Program, praises the generosity of the alumni, “It’s inspiring for all of us. It really underscores the fact that LaGuardia is a community and when these students graduate they are still a member of the Honors Program community.”

    The Honors Student Advisory Committee (HSAC) at LaGuardia is a student-driven collective focused on enriching students' college experience. Through a vibrant peer and alumni network, students get the tools they need to write their own futures. Established in the Fall of 2010, this community regularly coordinates peer-led transfer and scholarship workshops, as well as projects that promote civic engagement. As panel presenters at the annual conventions of the National Collegiate Honors Council and the Northeast Regional Honors Council, they shatter misperceptions about what it means to be a community college student. HSAC, like LaGuardia, believes in the transformative power of an Honors education and in making it available to all. Visit www.laguardiahonors.com to learn more.

     

      • • • •  

     

      

    LaGuardia Community College located in Long Island City, Queens, was founded in 1971 as a bold experiment in opening the doors of higher education to all, and we proudly carry forward that legacy today. LaGuardia educates students through over 50 degree, certificate and continuing education programs, providing an inspiring place for students to achieve their dreams. Upon graduation, LaGuardia students’ lives are transformed as family income increases 17%, and students transfer to four-year colleges at three times the national average. Part of the City University of New York (CUNY), LaGuardia is a nationally recognized leader among community colleges for boundary-breaking success educating underserved students. At LaGuardia we imagine new ideas, create new curriculum and pioneer programs to make our community and our country stronger. Visit www.lagcc.cuny.edu to learn more.

     

     ###  

     

     

    [First] [Previous] [Next] [Last]

LaGuardia Community College LaGuardia Community College 31-10 Thomson Ave. Long Island City, NY 11101 LaGuardia Community College 1-718-482-7200 LaGuardia Community College Map & Directions
Copyright © All Rights Reserved