Modern Languages and Literatures Majors

Liberal Arts (AA) Spanish Translation Major

The goal of this major will be to provide students with a strong foundation in both the English and Spanish languages, as well as in Latin American and Peninsular culture and literature in order to transfer to Hunter College to pursue a bachelor of arts degree in Spanish translation. The core consists of 33 credits: 15 in English, 15 in existing and newly created courses in Spanish language, Latin American and Spanish culture and literature, and 3 in linguistics. These courses will refine the language skills and cultural literacy of students of Spanish and enable an ever-increasing number of second language Spanish learners to develop the academic competencies necessary to pursue a professional career as a Spanish translator after completion of degrees at a senior college and beyond. The program requires students to take 15 credits in English language and literature since the receiving college expects entering students to have mastered the grammar and vocabulary of both languages, and also to give non-native speakers oft Spanish the option of translating from Spanish to English once they transfer to Hunter College. The newly created Spanish translation major at Hunter College responds to the need for professionally trained interpreters and translators in Spanish. Hunter College selectively accepts students who are already proficient in both English and Spanish, and in Spanish and Latin American literature and culture; thus, our program could provide a feeder into the Hunter program by bringing students to the point of entrance into the Hunter program. The articulation with Hunter College will focus on channeling students into their newly created translation program. The new courses are being developed with close attention to parallel courses in the receiving institution in order to facilitate the articulation process. laGuardia graduates will need to pass an entrance examination at Hunter College. Our grammar and composition courses in Spanish will prepare students for that test, while the rigorous English grammar courses will enable students to pass the English test.

Students enrolled in the Spanish-English Translation program will be able to complete internships at a range of government agencies and nonprofit organizations available through the Cooperative Education Department at LaGuardia. These work experiences enable the student to bridge the gap between classroom theory and practical applications in the field of translation and interpretation providing valuable experience for choosing a career and subsequent full-time employment. Students entering the Spanish-English Translation Program will not receive credit for prior knowledge of Spanish. Students who need additional skill development in reading, writing, mathematics, and communication will be required to take basic skills and/or ESL courses. These courses are not listed in the curriculum. Scores on the College placement test determine the particular courses students must successfully complete.

Pre-Pathways and Pathways curricula

All entering first-time freshmen in Fall 2013 and those who changed their majors after Spring 2013 are required to follow the Pathways curricula.

Advisement and e-Guidebook

Liberal Arts (AA) Latin American Studies Option

The Latin American Studies Option offers a sixty-credit curriculum, which meets the growing student demand for preparation in Latin American studies, Spanish language and literature, and bi-cultural studies with prospective applications in the fields of education, diplomacy, business, cross-cultural studies, and health care. The goals of the curriculum are to strengthen knowledge of Spanish and Latin American/Latino culture, to prepare students wishing to major in Spanish, Latin American Studies, international studies, and other social science-related fields at a senior college. Therefore, the curriculum is conceived as a structure for guiding Liberal Arts students toward career and professional goals early in their academic experience. LaGuardia has a tradition of opening the doors to higher education and the professions for nontraditional and ethnic and language minority students. This option follows in that tradition by creating a transfer path to baccalaureate programs in Latin American Studies and related fields. Nationally, the field of Latin American Studies has steadily expanded since its creation in the early 1920's. There are now one hundred and fifty-six U.S. colleges and universities that offer such programs. Among CUNY senior colleges, Brooklyn, City, Hunter, Lehman, Queens, and York offer a major/minor in this field. According to the 2000 U.S. Census, Latinos have become the largest and fastest growing ethnic group in the United States. As American society becomes increasingly pluralistic and multiethnic, there is a pressing need to prepare teachers and other professionals who are fluent in languages other than English and who demonstrate an understanding and familiarity with cross-cultural issues. Hence, the Latin American Studies curriculum will begin to develop proficiency in Spanish for non-native speakers and will enhance linguistic sophistication for heritage students, while strengthening cultural literacy.

Pre-Pathways and Pathways curricula

All entering first-time freshmen in Fall 2013 and those who changed their majors after Spring 2013 are required to follow the Pathways curricula.

Advisement and e-Guidebook

Liberal Arts (AA) Deaf Studies Option

During the past decade, public awareness concerning the needs of individuals with disabilities in the United States of America has become more prevalent. In the early 1990's, the Congress passed a legislation, Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) to promote quality and wellness of those who are disabled. The enforcement of ADA created accessibility and opportunities for individuals with disabilities in many areas where services are being provided. Deaf and hard of hearing individuals are given wide range of opportunities to fully participate in a mainstream society. The impact of this legislation leads to a high demand for skilled and trained workers to address the needs of Deaf and hard of hearing individuals in the fields of education, mental health, public services, and workforce. The ADA mandates that those who have a hearing loss be given the opportunity to see the language, to communicate effectively, and to learn visually with assertive support personnel and devices. Currently, there is a rapid-growing demand for sign language interpreters and specialists who can communicate in a visual-oriented language, American Sign Language. The demand highly exceeds the supply.

The Liberal Arts (AA) Deaf Studies Option includes orientation to Deafness, visual-based language (American Sign Language), cultural and behavioral discourses, and historical and social perspectives. The goal of Deaf Studies is to prepare graduates for paraprofessional positions to work with Deaf and hard of hearing communities, and also to prepare those who wish to pursue their study at a B.A. and MA programs specializing in interpreting, counseling, special education, and social work.

A large significant amount of students who enroll in Deaf Studies program will have opportunities to enter the workforce directly upon completion of associates studies due to the growing demand. The possibilities of finding work is endless. Associate of Arts graduates are expected to be qualified for paraprofessional positions; such as, teacher's assistants, case managers, residential counselors, tutors, after-school recreational counselors and job coaches. Deaf and hard of hearing students who wish to work within their own communities will also be provided with the opportunity to prepare for these jobs. The presence of more Deaf and hard of hesriag individuals in the job market will also require the availability of more non-deaf individuals who can communicate fluently in American Sign Language in support positions in public agencies, business offices and service industries.

Graduating students from the Deaf Studies program are expected to obtain necessary knowledge and skills in working with Deaf and hard of hearing population. Students are expected to demonstrate their proficiency in American Sign Language; foundational knowledge of the history and cultures of Deaf and hard of hearing communities; foundational knowledge in the liberal arts human relations training and cooperative education experience in work with Deaf and hard of hearing individuals.

Pre-Pathways and Pathways curricula

All entering first-time freshmen in Fall 2013 and those who changed their majors after Spring 2013 are required to follow the Pathways curricula.

Advisement and e-Guidebook

Liberal Arts (AA) Japanese Option (expected in Spring 2014)

The Japanese language is one of the most popular modern languages in the U.S. and the number of college students studying Japanese is on increase. (10.3% in 2006-2009 according to Furman et al., (2010)). New York, especially Manhattan and Queens, has a high density of Japanese language learners and a recent survey by MLA shows that more than 50,000 people are currently learning Japanese in Queens.

The Japanese culture is undoubtedly a major attraction to those learners. Japanese food, such as sushi and ramen, has become a popular choice among New Yorkers. Most college students in the U.S. have played Japanese video games in their youth (or even now) and have gone to karaoke to hang out with their friends. The pop-culture, including anime and TV drama, is another major interest among Japanese language learners. In addition to these contemporary culture, Japan has rich traditions and classical literature, such as karate and judo (Japanese martial arts), The Tale of Genji (classical novel written in the 11th century), and nihonga (classic Japanese fine art) to name a few.

At LaGuardia, we offer the following Japanese or Japan-related courses: Elementary Japanese 1 (ELJ101), Elementary Japanese 2 (ELJ102), Intermediate Japanese 1 (ELJ103), Intermediate Japanese 2 (ELJ104), Japanese for Heritage Students (ELJ105), Modern Japanese Literature (ELJ201; taught in Japanese), Japanese Literature in Translation (ELJ250; taught in English), The Art of East Asia (HUA191), East Asian Civilization and Societies (SSH110). Please see the attached brochure for more information about the Japanese option and required courses.

Pathways curricula

All entering first-time freshmen in Fall 2013 and those who changed their majors after Spring 2013 are required to follow the Pathways curricula.

Advisement and e-Guidebook

Questions?

Contact the Program Coordinator at the contact information page.