• Social Science

  • Chair of Department:

    Lorraine Cohen 
    icon phone(718) 482-5797
    icon email cohenlo@lagcc.cuny.edu 



  • Anthropology

  •  SSA100 Introduction to Anthropology

    3 credits; 3 hours

    In this course, students will be introduced to the fields of anthropology-physical anthropology, archaeology, cultural anthropology, and anthropological topics in linguistics. The aim shall be to explore the origins and development of some of the world’s hunter-gatherer, agricultural, peasant and industrial societies. Utilizing examples from both extinct and modern-day societies, the student will gain an appreciation of the wide diversity of human cultures.

    Prerequisite: CSE099, ENA/ENG/ESA099/ENC101


     SSA101 Cultural Anthropology

    3 credits; 3 hours

    This course examines the similarities and differences found in the various types of human cultures and societies. It acquaints students with the basic concepts that help explain differences and similarities. The role of culture and language in determining human behavior is examined as is the interrelationship of aspects of behavior (economics, politics, family, and religion) indifferent types of societies. Patterns of cultural change will also be discussed.

    Prerequisite: CSE099, ENA/ENG/ESA099/ENC101


     SSA103 Introduction to Archaeology

    3 credits; 3 hours

    This course provides an overview of the rapidly expanding field of Archaeology. Modern archaeological theories, the various disciplines of Archaeology, field techniques and the future of Archaeology will be covered. Emphasis will be placed on the history of the field, how modern archaeology varies from its earlier processes, and how archaeology relates to the various fields of social and natural sciences. Instruction will include both guided and assigned field trips.

    Prerequisites: CSE099, ENA/ENG/ESA/099/ENC101, MAT096


     SSA106 Anthropology of Latin America

    3 credits; 3 hours

    This course will focus on the different peoples and cultures of Latin America, including Indian groups, rural communities of peasants, blacks and other plantation workers, urbanized peasants, urban workers, new middle classes and elites. The social and cultural organization of each of these groups will be examined, particularly in their relationship to the larger society.The impact of the global economy on Latin American cultures will also be examined.

    Prerequisite: CSE099, ENA/ENG/ESA099/ENC101


     SSA120 Peoples and Cultures of the Caribbean

    3 credits; 3 hours

    This course will survey the evolution of cultures in the Caribbean from the original formation of Native American societies through the age of European conquest, colonization and cultural dominance, to the contemporary period of national independence, and the revival of previously marginalized, subordinated cultures. The focus will be on analyzing the unique Caribbean economic, family, stratification, political, and cultural systems formed out of the fusion of Native American, European, African and Asian peoples and cultures.

    Prerequisite: ENC/ENG101


     SSN182 Urban Anthropology

    3 credits; 3 hours

    This course examines urban culture and society in different partsof the world. It includes an examination of the role cities play indifferent societies, urbanization in developing societies, and acomparison of urban society and culture in developing societieswith urban life in the United States. Field trips to sites in NewYork City such as new immigrant communities will be includedto familiarize the students with recent changes in urban culture

    Prerequisite: CSE099, ENA/ENG/ESA099/ENC101, MAT095,and one Social Science elective from the list on page 174.This is a Writing Intensive course.


     SSN-HUN180 Introduction to Intercultural Communications

    3 credits; 3 hours

    The course introduces students to the dynamics of intercultural communication and enables them to communicate more effectively in multicultural settings. Through field trips, cultural research, and role-plays, students develop the skills needed to look objectively at other cultures. Using New York City as a laboratory, they gain experience identifying and analyzing dominant cultural patterns, thus improving their ability to understand the often perplexing behavior of people from cultures other than their own.

    Prerequisite: MAT095, ENC/ENG101, HUC101 or HUL100, and one Social Science elective from the list on page 174. This is a Writing Intensive course.


  • Criminal Justice

  •  SSJ101 Introduction to Criminal Justice

    3 credits; 3 hours

    This course provides an introductory survey of the American criminal justice system and its four key components: police,courts, corrections and the juvenile justice system. It will introduce students to the definition, measurement and causes of crime. General issues for consideration will include the role of discretion in the administration of criminal justice, due process,and contemporary changes in the American criminal justice system.

    Prerequisite: CSE099, ENA/ENG/ESA099/ENC101


     SSJ102 Criminology

    3 credits; 3 hours

    This course explores the nature, causes and treatment of criminal behavior with an emphasis on classical and contemporary theories. The biological, social, psychological and environmental theories underlying crime and deviance are explored, as well as current approaches to punishment, treatment and prevention.

    Prerequisite: ENC/G101, SSJ101


     SSJ202 Corrections and Sentencing

    3 credits; 3 hours

    This course examines the policies and practices of the criminal justice system following the arrest and conviction of a crime,including correctional law. The historical development of correctional institutions and corrections and sentencing ideology are discussed, as well as the functions of agencies that provide correctional services: probation, jails, prisons, parole and intermediate sanctions. In addition, important controversies and major trends in contemporary correctional practice are explored.

    Prerequisite: ENC/G101, SSJ101


     SSJ203 Policing

    3 credits; 3 hours

    This course examines the historical development, present organization and multiple functions of policing. Readings based on theory and empirical research will examine key areas in policing including: recruitment and training; stress and hazards of policing; police subcultures; methods of policing; criminal investigation; legal concerns; police accountability, ethics and corruption; community policing and police-minority relations.

    Prerequisite: ENC/G101, SSJ101


     SSN204 Crime and Justice in Urban Society

    3 credits; 3 hours

    This course examines critical issues concerning crime and justice in urban settings. Some issues are current and topical, applying to the contemporary urban crime scene; others persist across generations. Themes explored include fear, crime and the city;social disorganization; prisoner reintegration; policing, gangs and gun control; and drug laws. This course will be a writing intensive and e-portfolio course with an experiential component.

    Prerequisite: ENC/G101, SSJ101
    This is a Writing Intensive course.


  • Economics

  •  SSE103 Introduction to Microeconomics

    3 credits; 3 hours

    This course will study price determination and distribution under alternative market structures as well as government intervention in the market. A comparison of the market economy to alternative systems will also be examined.

    Prerequisite: CSE099, ENA/ENG/ESA099/ENC101, MAT096


     SSE104 Introduction to Macroeconomics

    3 credits; 3 hours

    This course will examine what determines the aggregate level of economic activity. The levels of production, employment and prices will be studied in relationship to aggregate expenditures. Institution arrangements of monetary and fiscal policy to address unemployment and inflation will also be covered.

    Prerequisite: CSE099, ENA/ENG/ESA099/ENC101, MAT096


     SSE105 International Economics

    3 credits; 3 hours

    This course introduces students to the allocation of resources in the world economy. Specifically, students will examine how capitalist and socialist countries manage their resources. In addition, students will learn about major issues in international trade and finance, economic development in third world countries, pollution and the environment, defense spending, and the economics of energy.

    Prerequisite: CSE099, ENA/ENG/ESA099/ENC101, MAT096


     SSE125 World Geography

    3 credits; 3 hours

    The course studies the influence of physical features and climates of the world on human activities, production, distribution, and other economic activities. Emphasis is placed on the location and distribution patterns of the world’s resources and their uses. Topics studied include urban geography, geopolitics of oil and gas, and preparation and interpretations of maps by physical features and cultural aspects.

    Prerequisite: CSE099, ENA/ENG/ESA099/ENC101, MAT095


     SSN189 The Urban Economy

    3 credits; 3 hours

    This course examines key economic problems facing cities and urban neighborhoods, particularly those of New York City. The students will study how supply and demand, land use, taxation,national product, unions and state and federal policies affect the local economy. Through visits in their neighborhoods, and such places as the Office of Economic Development and the Stock Exchange, students will apply the above concepts to local issues of employment, housing, transportation and business activity.

    Prerequisite: CSE099, ENA/ENG/ESA099/ENC101, MAT095,and one Social Science elective from the list on page 174
    This is a Writing Intensive course.


  • History

  •  SSH101 Themes in American History to 1865

    3 credits; 3 hours

    This course will focus on the major themes in American History from the colonial period to the Civil War. Topics such as slavery, women’s roles, expansion, urbanization, reform movements, and the development of the American character will be examined in this course.

    Prerequisite: CSE099, ENA/ENG/ESA099/ENC101


     SSH102 Themes in American History Since 1865

    3 credits; 3 hours

    This course will examine American history since 1865. Such topics as industrialization, labor unions, immigration, organization, political parties, reform movements, foreign policy, and the rise of the U.S. as the major force in the world will be covered in this course.

    Prerequisite: CSE099, ENA/ENG/ESA099/ENC101


     SSH103 Western Civilization from Ancient Times to the Renaissance

    3 credits; 3 hours

    This course investigates the main features of human civilization from ancient times to the Renaissance. The importance of geography, religion, custom and ideology are explored for the purpose of capturing the spirit of the past as well as understanding its relationship to the present.

    Prerequisite: CSE099, ENA/ENG/ESA099/ENC101


     SSH104 Western Civilization from the Renaissance to Modern Times

    3 credits; 3 hours

    This course discusses the major ways in which Western society has changed over the past 250 years. It covers the scientific revolution, the industrial revolution, and the major political revolutions. It also explores the impact of ideas such as liberalism, Marxism, Darwinism, Nazism and Freudianism. The two World Wars and prospects for world peace are examined.

    Prerequisite: CSE099, ENA/ENG/ESA099/ENC101


     SSH105 World History from Ancient Times to 1500

    3 credits; 3 hours

    This course is an introduction to world history from the earliest human records to the renewal of contact between the Eastern and Western hemispheres around 1500 C.E. Students will read primary and secondary sources related to the political, economic, social and cultural history of humanity with emphasis on the comparative development of civilization, the role of nomadic and pre-literate societies, and the interactions among different peoples and civilizations.

    Prerequisite: CSE099, ENA/ENG/ESA099/ENC101


     SSH106 World History from 1500 to the Present

    3 credits; 3 hours

    This course is an introduction to world history from around 1500 C.E. to the present. Students will read primary and secondary sources related to the political, economic, social and cultural history of humanity in the modern era, including such topics as the development of the nation-state, industrialization, world trade, imperialism, democratic, socialist, and nationalistic revolutions, the position of women in society, population growth, and changes in the human environment.

    Prerequisite: CSE099, ENA/ENG/ESA099/ENC101


     SSH110 East Asian Civilization and Societies

    3 credits; 3 hours

    This course concentrates on one of the oldest continuous civilizations in the world, East Asia, which includes, in geographical and cultural terms, the domains of China, Japan, Korea and Vietnam. Using both chronological and topical approaches, the course examines historical and social development in East Asia. Topics include the dynastic transition, economic structures, social organizations and customs, as well as the scholarly and artistic traditions in East Asia. Throughout the course, students learn to appreciate the richness of East Asian culture and gain a knowledge of the growing political and economic power of this region.

    Prerequisite: CSE099, ENA/ENG/ESA099/ENC101


     SSH231 Afro-American History

    3 credits; 3 hours

    This is an introduction to some of the basic issues in the black American’s struggle against slavery and racist oppression in the United States. Special attention is given to the following: the methods that blacks have used in their attempts to bring about social change; important persons and institutions from the African beginning to the present; and the contributions black shave made to American society.

    Prerequisite: CSE099, ENA/ENG/ESA099/ENC101


     SSH232 Survey of Latin America and Caribbean History

    3 credits; 3 hours

    This course begins with a study of the interaction between the Indian, European, and African peoples who shaped the history of Latin America and the Caribbean. It then considers the colonial period, the Independence movements, and the challenge of modernization in selected Latin American and Caribbean nations. The relationship between Latin America and the United States will also be discussed.

    Prerequisite: CSE099, ENA/ENG/ESA099/ENC101


     SSN183 History of Minorities

    3 credits; 3 hours

    This course focuses on the experiences of and challenges to minorities in the United States. It examines changing patterns of the immigration, settlement, and employment of various minority groups including Afro-Americans, Irish-Americans,Hispanic-Americans and Asian-Americans. In addition, the situation of the Native Americans, women, gays and the aged will be discussed in an historical context.

    Prerequisite: CSE099, ENA/ENG/ESA099/ENC101, MAT095,and one Social Science elective from the list on page 174
    This is a Writing Intensive course.


     SSN199 Neighborhood History

    3 credits; 3 hours

    This course will study the social, economic, and political changes of New York City neighborhoods. The focus will be on the people who migrated into, lived, and then moved out of these neighborhoods. Through field research, students will look closely at such things as immigration, housing, businesses, government legislation, and mass transit lines that have significantly affected neighborhood changes. The course will include field trips such as walking tours and a visit to Ellis Island.

    Prerequisite: CSE099, ENA/ENG/ESA099/ENC101, MAT095,and one Social Science elective from the list on page 174
    This is a Writing Intensive course.


     SSN240 History of New York City

    3 credits; 3 hours

    This course is about the development of New York City from colonial times to the present. It deals with changes in housing, transportation, immigration, politics and social classes. The rise of New York City as a financial and cultural center will be discussed. New York City’s current problems and future prospects will be assessed. The course includes a walking tour of old New York and a museum trip.

    Prerequisite: CSE099, ENA/ENG/ESA099/ENC101, and oneSocial Science elective from the list on page 174
    This is a Writing Intensive course.


  • Political Sciences

  •  SSN190 Leadership

    3 credits; 3 hours

    This course explores alternative leadership theories and styles. It focuses on leadership within the urban context and on the importance of New York City figures such as Boss Tweed, Fiorello H. LaGuardia and Shirley Chisholm. Special reference will be made to the particular leadership problems presented by cities. The course will include speakers and field trips to centers of leadership in New York City, either on the citywide or community level, in the public or private sector.

    Prerequisite: CSE099, ENA/ENG/ESA099/ENC101 and one Social Science elective from the list on page 174This is a Writing Intensive course.


     SSN192 Practical Politics in New York City

    3 credits; 3 hours

    This course examines New York City as a unique political entity within the context of urban politics in America. It explores the roles of elected officials, community boards, unions, minority groups and business interests in political decision making. The course includes guest speakers and field trips.

    Prerequisite: CSE099, ENA/ENG/ESA099/ENC101, and one Social Science elective from the list on page 174
    This is a Writing Intensive course.


     SSN210 The Politics of Sexuality

    3 credits; 3 hours

    This course explores how urbanization and socio-economic development have made sexuality a political issue. Topics are discussed from a cross-cultural perspective and include separation of sexuality from reproduction, AIDS, alternative definitions of family, the extent of personal freedom as compared with social control of sexual expression and others. Special attention is given to how these topics are addressed through feminist, religious, gay/lesbian and other movements. At least two field trips are required.

    Prerequisite: CSE099, ENA/ENG/ESA099/ENC101, MAT095,and one Social Science elective from the list on page 174
    This is a Writing Intensive course.


     SSP101 U.S. Power and Politics

    3 credits; 3 hours

    This course analyzes the relationship between the theory, form,and practice of American government. The course studies the strengths and weaknesses of the American political system. A major concern of the course is the nature of power in America and the options for reforming the American political system.

    Prerequisite: CSE099, ENA/ENG/ESA099/ENC101


     SSP200 Global Politics

    3 credits; 3 hours

    This course will investigate the dynamics of global politics among nation states and other actors in global affairs. After an introduction to the international system and globalization, the class will study major international relations theories and use them to analyze current and past events in global politics. The course will explore various global issues including war, terrorism, genocide, security, peace building, development, human rights, free trade etc. Students will focus on case studies of their choice.

    Prerequisite: CSE099, ENA/ENG/ESA099/ENC101


     SSP220 Politics of Latin America and the Caribbean

    3 credits; 3 hours

    This course will examine the major groups which seek power in Latin America and the Caribbean, and analyze the various strategies they use including revolution, populism, democratic reform, socialism and military authority. The prospects for modernization will be drawn from a variety of Latin American and Caribbean countries. The course includes discussion of the role of foreign nations in the politics of this area.

    Prerequisite: CSE099, ENA/ENG/ESA099/ENC101, MAT095


     SSP240 Crime and Punishment

    3 credits; 3 hours

    This course deals with the purposes and problems of penal systems, old and new, national and international. The course will investigate the relationship between the criminal, punishment, society and politics. Selected famous cases will be studied in detail as will the American criminal justice system and the issue of the death penalty.

    Prerequisite: CSE099, ENA/ENG/ESA099/ENC101


     SSP245 Law and Human Rights in America

    3 credits; 3 hours

    This course will focus on the legal aspects of human rights issues in America. Starting with the origins of democracy and the Bill of Rights, students will explore major Supreme Court cases and Constitutional amendments dealing with such topics as freedom of speech, freedom of the press, freedom of religion, the right to vote, equality before the law, and the rights of the accused.Controversial contemporary issues such as abortion, privacy, and gun control will also be discussed in a legal context.

    Prerequisite: CSE099, ENA/ENG/ESA099/ENC101


     SSP250 Political Ideas and Ideologies

    3 credits; 3 hours

    This course explores the relationship between political ideas and practice. Political ideologies such as liberalism, conservatism, socialism, and liberation ideologies (feminist, black and `gay/lesbian) are examined in their historical development. The relationship between their goals and the methods used to achieve them is analyzed and criticized. The relevance of these ideologies for understanding current political issues is discussed. Readings include original theories of politics as well ascommentaries upon them.

    Prerequisite: CSE099, ENA/ENG/ESA099/ENC101


  • Psychology

  •  SSN184 Environmental Psychology

    3 credits; 3 hours

    This course explores the relationship between the urban physical environment and human behavior. Topics to be considered include the effects of personal space, noise, crime, crowding, architectural design and urban blight on the actions and feelings of urban dwellers. Two field trips in this course will be based on research projects aimed at understanding behavior in such urban settings as subways, parks and neighborhoods.

    Prerequisite: CSE099, ENA/ENG/ESA099/ENC101, and oneSocial Science elective from the list on page 174
    This is a Writing Intensive course


     SSN280 Urban Black Psychology

    3 credits; 3 hours

    This course introduces students to psychological theories and issues relating to blacks in America. Emphasizing the shift from rural to urban environments, it examines the impact of slavery and racism on blacks. With special reference to New York City, the course investigates the relationship between black personality and family, education, work, culture and mental health. There will be field trips to Harlem and to a community mental health center.

    Prerequisite: CSE099, ENA/ENG/ESA099/ENC101, and oneSocial Science elective from the list on page 174
    This is a Writing Intensive course


     SSY101 General Psychology

    3 credits; 3 hours

    This course is an introduction to some of the major fields and theories in the science of psychology, covering a range of topics such as biological foundations, learning, cognition, emotion, perception, theories of personality, psychological disorders and their treatment and the research methods of psychology.

    Prerequisite: CSE099, ENA/ENG/ESA099/ENC101, MAT095


     SSY105 Learning and Education: Childhood to Adolescence

    3 credits; 3 hours

    This course examines the principles of child development from birth through adolescence, and explores how cognitive, emotional, physiological and social changes impact learning. The role of culture, family, race, class and environment will serve as the framework for understanding development and the nature of intelligence and its implications for how children learn in school. Students will be taught research and child observation methods and how to apply these tools in diverse educational and community settings.

    Prerequisite: ENC/ENG101
    This is a Writing Intensive course.


     SSY200 Personality

    3 credits; 3 hours

    Theories, methods, and selected issues in the field of personality will be discussed in the context of achieving greater self-awareness and insight into the behavior of others. Among the topics dicussed are: psychoanalytic, behavioristic, and phenomenological theories of personality types and traits, the achievement of self-knowledge, psychological testing, and personality research methods.

    Prerequisite: SSY101


     SSY205 Psychology of Women

    3 credits; 3 hours

    This course will critically examine gender bias and gender exclusion in research and theory in psychology. The topics will include interconnections between biology and gender, focusing on the psychological factors of menstruation, sexuality, pregnancy, childbirth, motherhood, abortion and menopause.The course will focus on the experiences of women of different racial and ethnic backgrounds and examine how these biological functions shape their identity. Throughout the course, students will critically examine the social and political contexts that define women’s bodies and familiarize themselves with critical feminist consciousness.

    Prerequisite: SSY101


     SSY210 Principles of Behavior Management

    3 credits; 3 hours

    This course will provide students with an overview of behavior modification principles which are based on theories of learning in relation to the acquisition, maintenance and modification of human behavior. The course focuses on the specific application of these principles to special needs populations. Topics will include assessment and data collection techniques, design of effective multicultural behavioral programs, and ethical issues in behavior treatment.

    Prerequisite: ENC/ENG101, SSY101


     SSY230 Abnormal Psychology

    3 credits; 3 hours

    This course introduces the major categories of psychological disorders and their symptoms, including diagnostic procedures, causal factors and treatment. Among the disorders covered are psychotic disorders, mood disorders, anxiety disorders, disorders of childhood and adolescence and personality disorders. Theoretical perspectives for understanding psychological disorders will also be discussed.

    Prerequisite: CSE099, ENA/ENG/ESA099/ENC101, MAT095,SSY101


     SSY240 Developmental Psychology I

    3 credits; 3 hours

    This course will address the theories of development while providing critical review of the relevant empirical data from conception to adolescence. It covers various domains of development in the growing child—physical, cognitive, social and emotional realms. Implications for parenting and schooling will be discussed within a cultural-historical context

    Prerequisite: SSY101


     SSY241 Developmental Psychology II

    3 credits; 3 hours

    This course examines the biological, psychological, and social changes in adults and the principles underlying these changes.The course explores such topics as social sex roles, self-identity, self-esteem, worker productivity, ideas and values. Students will learn about adult life crisis issues such as marriage, divorce, mid-life crisis, menopause, unemployment and aging.

    Prerequisite: SSY101


     SSY250 Social Psychology

    3 credits; 3 hours

    This course examines how the individual’s personality is affected by the influences of other people and the physical environment. Among the topics discussed are: forming attitudes, conformityin groups, helping others, prejudice and environmental stress.Research methods will also be introduced.

    Prerequisite: SSY101


     SSY260 Group Dynamics

    3 credits; 3 hours

    This is an introduction to the theory, research and practice of group dynamics, and small group interaction in a variety of settings. Methods and techniques utilized in the investigation of small group processes will be demonstrated and critically examined. Through participation in role playing and small group interaction, students will be introduced to basic principles of interpersonal and group dynamics in families, in groups, and at work.

    Prerequisite: SSY101


  • Sociology

  •  SSD-BTC105 Computers and Society

    3 credits; 3 hours

    This course examines the relationship between human values, society, and technology. It begins with an explanation of how computers work and then investigates how technology affects such issues as jobs, privacy and education. Lab work is included.

    Prerequisite: CSE099, ENA/ENG/ESA099/ENC101, MAT095


     SSI210 Women in Society

    3 credits; 3 hours

    The course will examine the role of women in society from historical and cross-cultural perspectives. It will examine women’s psychological issues, economic functions, and their relationships to social institutions. The debates surrounding women at work, women in politics and women’s movements will be discussed.

    Prerequisite: ENA/ENG/ESA099/ENC101, SSS100 or SSB110


     SSN103 Introduction to Labor and Community Organizing

    3 credits; 3 hours

    This course introduces social science perspectives on the theoryand practice of labor and community organizing within theurban environment. Students analyze case studies that focus onstruggles within a local and global context shaped by differentkinds of social inequality including class, race, ethnicity, gender,age and sexual orientation. Students will learn about newmodels of organizing, and organizing as a career. The class willgo on urban field trips and role-play organizing skills.

    Prerequisite: CSE099, ENA/ENG/ESA099/ENC101, and one Social Science elective from the list on page 174
    This is a Writing Intensive course.


     SSN186 Sociology of the Black Community

    3 credits; 3 hours

    This course is about the social dynamics of Black communities in urban America. With special reference to New York City, it examines the socialization process, the family, education and organizational life within urban Black communities. Current problems and future prospects for the urban Black community are discussed. Field trips to communities such as Harlem and Bedford Stuyvesant are included.

    Prerequisite: CSE099, ENA/ENG/ESA099/ENC101, MAT095, and one Social Science elective from the list on page 174
    This is a Writing Intensive course.


     SSN187 Urban Sociology

    3 credits; 3 hours

    This course examines changing ideas about the city and the changing impact of the city on American lifestyles. With reference to New York City, the course explores the origins and the social structure of the city. It focuses on the relationship of class to family, gender, education, ethnicity, religion, politics and economics. Visits to housing projects, community organizations or service delivery agencies will familiarize the students with the issues of planning and change in the city.

    Prerequisite: CSE099, ENA/ENG/ESA099/ENC101, MAT095, and one Social Science elective from the list on page 174
    Prerequisite for Computer Technology, and Engineering Science majors: CSE099, ENA/ENG/ESA099/ENC101, MAT095This is a Writing Intensive course.


     SSN194 Religion and Social Change

    3 credits; 3 hours

    This course will trace the evolution of traditional and nontraditional religions among various groups within the New York City religious community. The course will focus on Latin groups and Eastern religions as well as social action projects sponsored by mainline major denominational groups. Field interviews by students will be made.

    Prerequisite: CSE099, ENA/ENG/ESA099/ENC101, MAT095,and one Social Science elective from the list on page 174
    This is a Writing Intensive course.


     SSN202 Environmental Sociology

    3 credits; 3 hours

    This course examines sociological perspectives on the environment. It will explore how humans interact with and help to shape the environment. Special emphasis will be placed on the role that economics, politics, culture, science and technology play in urban environmental affairs. It will also apply basic sociological concepts such as social class, gender, race and ethnicity, inequality and conflict to environmental issues within urban settings.

    Prerequisite: CSE099, ENA/ENG/ESA099/ENC101, MAT095


     SSN-ENN193 Ideal Societies

    3 credits; 3 hours

    This course is designed to help students understand utopian movements in urban society from historical, psychological and sociological perspectives. This course will focus on both the causes for creating utopian experiments and the ways in which utopias approach family structure, religion, education, power and economic organization. Literary versions of utopian communities will be studied. Field trips may be taken to such places as Roosevelt Island and Shaker Village.

    Prerequisite: CSE099, ENA/ENG/ESA099/ENC101, and one Social Science elective from the list on page 174
    This is a Writing Intensive course.

     SSS100-SSB110 Introduction to Sociology: Contemporary Society

    3 credits; 3 hours

    This course offers students information and ideas with which to understand the social factors of human life. It places the study of social interaction, social processes, and social institutions in an historical context. It examines the human condition with particular reference to work, to culture, to personality, to ethnic, class, and gender relations, as well as to economic and political institutions. (SSB110 is the bilingual version of SSS100.)

    Prerequisite: CSE099, ENA/ENG/ESA099/ENC101
    Prerequisite for SSB110: CSE099, ESL/ESR098
    Pre- or Corequisite for SSB110: ESL/ESR099


     SSS102 Social Movements

    3 credits; 3 hours

    This course will examines the political and cultural conditions and the processes involved in the formation and functioning of social movements. Social movements are undersood as the organized, collective efforts of people to influence the direction of social change. Against the bacground of a broad historical and cross-cultural perpective, emphasis will be on social movements in the USA, including the labor movement, the civil rights movement and the women's movement. There will be at leats two field trips.

    Prerequisite: ENA/ENG/ESA099/ENC101 and SSS100 orSSB110


     SSS175 Sociology of Organizations

    3 credits; 3 hours

    This course will analyze the social structure and dynamics of large scale organizations such as the corporation, the government agency, and the labor union. It will examine the significance of these organizations in the larger world as well as investigate the social worlds which exist within these organizations. Through this course, the student will come to understand the interaction between individual personality and bureaucratic structure.

    Prerequisite: ENA/ENG/ESA099/ENC101, SSS100 or SSB110


     SSS185 Sociology of Education

    3 credits; 3 hours

    This course examines the social, cultural, political, and economic forces that have shaped the relationships between educational institutions and society. The course will look at such factors as family, economic status, community, conflicting perspectives on the nature and purpose of education, and the role of government. This course will also examine current debates in the field, including the role of teachers and teacher education.

    Prerequisite: ENA/ENG/ESA099/ENC101, SSS100 or SSB110


     SSS190 Sociology of the American Deaf Communities

    3 credits; 3 hours

    This course examines the concepts of culture and community and their applications to the deaf and hard of hearing communities. This inquiry leads to an understanding of the implications of culture and community for the individual and to an exploration of the current economic, political, and social issues with the deaf and hard of hearing communities, as well as future directions.

    Prerequisite: ENC/ENG101, SSS100 or SSB110


     SSS280 Sociology of the Family

    3 credits; 3 hours

    The course will examine the contemporary American family from historical and cross-cultural perspectives. It considers sub-cultural variations within American society; the influence of industrial and technological changes on family life; relationship of socialization to personality development; programs to meet family needs; dating, courtship and marriage.

    Prerequisite: ENA/ENG/ESA099/ENC101, SSS100 or SSB110


  • Urban Studies

  •  Social Science Course Prerequisite for Urban Study Courses designated SSN
    One of the following courses:
    • SSA100 Introduction to Anthropology
    • SSA101 Cultural Anthropology
    • SSE103 Introduction to Microeconomics
    • SSE104 Introduction to Macroeconomics
    • SSP101 U.S. Power and Politics
    • SSP250 Political Ideas and Ideologies
    • SSS100 Introduction to Sociology
    • SSY101 General Psychology
    • SSH101 Themes in American History to 1865
    • SSH102 Themes in American History since 1865
    • SSH103 Western Civilization from Ancient Times to the Renaissance
    • SSH104 Western Civilization from the Renaissance to Modern Times
    • SSH105 World History from Ancient Times to 1500
    • SSH106 World History from 1500 to the Present
    • SSH110 East Asia Civilization and Societies
    • SSH231 Afro-American History
    • SSH232 Survey of Latin American and Caribbean History

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