• Grants Office
  • General Grant Writing Resources

  •  Classic Guides and Articles


    Foundation Center
    “Proposal Writing Short Course”
    A good guide that covers gathering background information, components of a proposal, the budget, the components of a letter proposal. Particularly helpful on crafting the statement of need and the objectives.

    Deborah Kluge
    “Proposal Pointers and Pitfalls”
    Covers the RFP, proposal outline and schedule, proposal preparation and costing, and pitfalls.

    Jacob Kraicer (University of Toronto)
    “The Art of Grantsmanship”
    Lots of good advice. Good discussion of how the review process functions. 13 pp.

    S. Joseph Levine (Michigan State University)
    “Guide for Writing a Funding Proposal”
    Writing hints and an example for each part of a proposal.

    Jeremy T. Miner and Lynn E. Miner
    “A Guide to Proposal Planning and Writing”
    For each and every section of the proposal, key questions to answer, advice, and writing tips. Sample letter proposal. Particular attention to questions one might ask the program officer and a past grantee, cost-sharing, and the appearance of the proposal. 25+ pp.

     

     National Science Foundation
    “A Guide for Proposal Writing”
    Excellent advice for proposal writers. 20+ pp.

    Adam Przeworski and Frank Salomon (Social Science Research Council)
    “The Art of Writing Proposals: Some Candid Suggestions for Applicants to Social Science Research Council Competitions”
    A brief article with wise advice.

    Janet S. Rasey (University of Washington)
    “Fundamentals of Grantsmanship”
    A short guide with basic principles and advice from the pre-proposal stage through resubmission.

    Don Thackrey (University of Michigan)
    “Proposal Writer’s Guide”
    A complete guide. Discusses why proposals are rejected.

     

     Mega-Sites

    Catherine Callow-Heusser (Utah State University)
    “Digital Resources for Evaluators”
    A enormous mega-site on evaluation with links to communities of evaluators, education and training programs, relevant agencies and organizations, evaluation companies and consultants, evaluation texts and documents, instruments, data surveys, statistics, software, funding sources, and other mega-sites and reference sites.

    CDC Evaluation Working Group
    “Resources”
    A mother lode on evaluation. Organized in sections: Organizations, Societies, Foundations, Association; Journals and Online Publications; Step-by-Step Manuals; Logic Model Resources; Planning and Performance Improvement Tools; Reports and Publications.

    CUNY Graduate Center
    “Student Affairs A-Z Grants and Resources Database”
    An alphabetical resource, nicely annotated, directed at graduate students, but often cites grants of general interest to all scholars or young scholars.

    Internet Prospector
    “Foundations”
    An excellent portal to private funding sources, international funding, and sources of fundraising news.

    Deborah Kluge
    “Grantwriting Resources”
    A mega-site with annotated links to many other useful sites.
     

    International Association for Social Science Information Services & Technology
    “Resources”
    22 guides for data management. See what Oxford, Yale, the University of Michigan, the Australian National University, MIT, and others have to say on the subject.

    Michigan State University
    “Grants and Related Resources”
    An excellent and comprehensive library guide to foundations, grants, grantsmanship, and relevant websites. Covers print and online indexes to grants, foundation directories, an exhaustive list of government agency websites, a list of grant sources organized by topic, a list of grant sources for individuals organized by topic, print and web guides and articles on grantsmanship and philanthropy, and more.

    National Institutes of Health
    “Resources for New Investigators”
    Lists helpful sites provided by the various NIH institutes, as well as some general NIH and non-NIH resources.

    University of New Hampshire (Office of Sponsored Research)
    Not the largest, but a very good collection of sites. Guides to grants writing provided by many federal agencies and guides produced by various non-governmental authors and sources.

    University of Pittsburgh
    “Proposal Writing Websites”
    An excellent site linking to various proposal-writing manuals and guides, as well as bibliographies and internet resources.

    University of Wisconsin-Madison (Libraries)
    “Grant Proposal Writing: Websites”
    A helpful listing of more than 20 sites that provide advice on preparing proposals.
     

    Planet Earth Primer
    “Grants Index”
    A very robust site. Links to many funding sources and many guides on writing grants.


     

     Brief Guides and Articles

    Appalachian Regional Commission (Online Resource Center)
    “Preparing a Grant Proposal: Five Steps in the Proposal Writing Process” 

    The five steps: agree on the problem, describe what you hope to achieve, design your program, locate funding sources, write your proposal.
     

     Pam L. Member
    NSF Grant Reviewer Tells All

    A page or so on what NSF reviewers are looking for.
     

     Catalogue of Federal Domestic Assistance
    “Writing Grants”
    A two-parter: (1) Developing a Grant Proposal, and (2) Writing the Grant Proposal. Topics include developing ideas, identifying funding resources, getting organized to write, and the eight basic components of a proposal.
     

     Susan Chandler
    “Writing Proposals for Capacity Building”
    Looks at a special kind of proposal. Covers the different components (introduction, needs statement, objectives, methods, evaluation) and further reading.

     

     University of Massachusetts-Amherst
    “Proposal Development Toolkits & Resources”
    A very handy guide to the grant-writing assistance – often extensive – provided by major government agencies (NSF, NIH, Department of Energy, DOD, USDA, Department of Education, EPA).

     

     Elizabeth Jakob, Adam Porter, Jeffrey Podos, Barry Braun, Norman Johnson, and Stephen Vessey
    “How to Fail in Grant Writing” (The Chronicle of Higher Education)
    UMass faculty tell you what not to do – divided into categories (content, format and style, the literature, the impact statement).

     

     George A. Hazelrigg (NSF)
    “Twelve Steps to a Winning Research Proposal”
    A veteran NSF program officer offers 12 pieces of advice.

     

     American Astronomical Society
    “Hints on Preparing Research Proposals”
    Summary of a panel discussion on writing grant proposals, offering over 30 suggestions. Additional information and hints are provided by both an official of the NASA Office of Space Science and the Executive Officer of the AAS.

     

    University of Rhode Island
    “How to Fail in Grant Writing – A Humorous Approach to Improving Your Skills”

    Touches on content, format and style, the literature, the impact statement, and relations with the program officer.

     

     University of Rhode Island
     “Using the Request for Proposals (RFP) to Help Write a Fundable Proposal”
    Areas to consider include the program goals, eligibility requirements, submission deadlines, funding limitations, anticipated funding, application procedures and guidelines, review criteria, award conditions and reporting requirements, contact information, and related agency programs.
     

     University of Rhode Island
     “How to Fail in Grant Writing – A Humorous Approach to Improving Your Skills”
    Touches on content, format and style, the literature, the impact statement, and relations with the program officer.

     

    Kathryn S. Brown (The Scientist)
    “A Winning Strategy for Grant Applications: Focus on Impact”
    An older piece (1997), but still good advice on how creativity and writing style matter even for scientists.

     


    David Bond, Anne Dickinson, Cindy Gary, Gail Hyde (Rochester Institute of Technology)
    “Writing a Succesful Proposal”
    Lengthy and useful PowerPoint presentation. Sections on: mission, goals, objectives; literature review and problem statement; involving students; the narrative (introduction, need, significance, project design, project management, quality of project personnel, evaluation, dissemination, institutional capacity, references, bios, letters of support); budget; reviewing the proposal; what to do if not funded.

     

    Gary Carnow (Scholastic, Inc.)
    “What Do Winning Proposals Have in Common?”
    A brief list of 10 tips.

     

    Catalog of Federal Domestic Assistance
    “Developing and Writing Grant Proposals”
    Covers developing the proposal (idea, support) and writing the proposal (components, goals, problem statement, methods, plan of action, evaluation, budget planning).

     

    20 things to keep in mind.

     
    Central Piedmont Community College
    “Commonly Used Grant Terminology”
    An alphabetic guide.

    College of William and Mary (Office of Grants and Research Administration)
    “Letter Proposals”
    A brief description of the objectives and parts of a letter proposal.

    Susan Compo (The Grantsmanship Center)
    "No Mercy from the Margin Police: When the Feds Say One Inch, They Mean One Inch". A chilling tale of your government at work. But, it makes the point loud and clear: when writing a grant, follow the instructions to the letter.

    CUNY Graduate Center
    “Some Tips on Proposal Writing”
    The five secrets of successful grantseekers, plus concise tips on planning, research, writing and preparing the application, and clarifying goals.

    DePaul University (Office of Sponsored Programs and Research)
    “Evaluating Funding Opportunities”
    A brief, but thoughtful, chart that helps one determine whether a particular RFP is the right one for a particular project.

    Marilyn Dickey (The Chronicle of Philanthropy)
    “Grant Makers Reveal the Most Common Reasons Grant Proposals Get Rejected”
    A brief article with common sense advice.


    National Science Foundation
    The NSF has a number of specific requirements that must be met in virtually every application. With credit to the University of Rhode Island for the organizing scheme, here are the places where these requirements are explained.
    Grant Proposal Guide

                Review Criteria 
                

                Intellectual Merit (Requirement) 
     

                Intellectual Merit (Detailed Discussion on Meeting the Requirement of Transformative Research)  

     

                Broader Impacts (Requirement) 

     

                Broader Impacts (Detailed Discussion on Meeting the Requirement) 


                Postdoc Mentoring Plan (Detailed Discussion) 
               
     

                NOTE: Click on “Postdoc Mentoring Plan (sample plan)”
     

                Data Management Plan (Requirement) 
     

                Biosketch Guidelines 
     

    California Department of Education  

    "Writing Effective Proposals" 

     

    Catalog of Federal Domestic Assistance

    “Developing and Writing Grant Proposals”
     

     Joel Orosz (W.R. Kellogg Foundation)
    “Proposals: The Good, Bad and the Ugly”

    Meredith Roche
    “Writing the Proposal of the Future” 


    Rochester Institute of Technology,
    “Tips for Success”

    Rochester Institute of Technology,
    “Writing a Successful Proposal” 

     

     Anne Farmer (Johnson County Community College)
    “Grants”
    Nice discussion of the elements of a proposal: title, abstract, introductions, problem statement, program objectives, qualifications (i.e., selling your ability to undertake the project), methods, evaluation, sustainability, budget. Chief source is Getting Funded by Mary Hall (1988).

    Georgia Institute of Technology (Office of Sponsored Programs)
    “Submitting a Proposal via Grants.gov”
    Two step-by-step tutorials – one for Windows and one for the Mac – illustrated with views of the screens that one uses. It is not easy.
    Windows Version     

    Mac Version   

     

    GuideStar.org
    “What Grantmakers Want Applicants to Know” 

    Fifteen pieces of advice from funders.

    David Hemenway (University of Vermont)
    “How to Improve Your Score When Submitting a Grant Proposal”
    Advice on avoiding a multitude of common errors.

    Kenneth T. Henson (Chronicle of Higher Education)
    “Debunking Some Myths About Grant Writing”
    Six myths debunked, followed by six tips.

    Simon Peyton Jones and Alan Bundy (Microsoft.com)
    “Writing a Good Grant Proposal”
    Good advice. Covers: making the case for support, criteria of a good grant proposal, common shortcomings.

    Judith Killen (University of Missouri-Kansas City)
    “20 Reasons Why Proposals Aren’t Funded”
    A nice distillation of reviewers’ comments.

    Norton Kirtz (The Grantsmanship Center)
    “Hard Data/Soft Data: How They Help You Build Strong Proposals”
    Specific help in using both hard data and soft data to build credibility and document a problem statement.

    Glenn Krell (Illinois Institute of Technology)
    “Talking to a Sponsor Before Sending in a Proposal”
    A strong argument for always trying to talk to the sponsor before submission.

    Glenn Krell (Illinois Institute of Technology)
    “Delivering a ‘Knockout Punch’ in Your Proposal Summary”
    A very brief piece on why the proposal summary is critical.

    Bennett Grassano (CompuMentor)
    "Ten Steps for Funding Technology"
    The ten steps to follow include several advising budgeting changes.

    Literacy Education Online
    “Writing Abstracts”
    Covers types of abstracts, qualities of a good abstract, and steps in writing an effective abstract.

    Linda A. Long (www.schoolgrants.org)
    "Nine Secrets of Successful proposals"
    A freelance writer offers a brief page of tips, derived from conversations with foundation program officers.

    Maine Philanthropy Center
    “Proposal Writing Basics: Top 30 Grantwriting Tips and Strategies”
    Geared to small non-profits.

    Part II- More advice, including how to get examples of past proposals and how to align with the goals of the funder.
     

    Worchester Polytechnic Institute
    “Proposal Writing Tips”  

     

    Vid Mohan-Ram

    How Not To Kill A Grant
     

    Part 1: ”Murder Most Foul”  
     

    Part 2: “Abstract Killers”

    Part 3: “So What?”

    Part 4: “Lost at Sea”

    Part 5: “The Facts of the Case”

    Part 6: “Developing the Research Plan”
     

     Longer Guides and Articles

     

     Inter-University Consortium for Political and Social Research
    Data Management
    Now that many federal agencies (e.g., NIH, NSF) require a data management plan, here is a guide to assist researchers in devising such a plan. The site has sections on creating an effective data management plan, resources and a sample plan, and a section with frequently-asked questions and answers. The site includes a webinar on data management plans. Finally, there is a tool developed by the California Digital Library for creating a customized plan. Nicely done.

    Albert Einstein College of Medicine
    “Faculty Grants Guide: Site Map of Topics”
    Table of contents includes idea development, components of a proposal,
    planning, reviewers, why proposals are not funded, types and sources of funding,
    and various funding sources. Also a grants glossary.

    American Association of State Colleges and Universities (Grant Resources Center)
    “Guide to Technology Grants”
    Dated at this point (2000), but still worth a look as a valuable starting place in searching for funding in educational technology, SMET/information technology, and biotechnology. Each funding possibility described in a paragraph.

    Asian Institute of Technology (Language Center)
    “Writing Up Research: The Guidebook”
    A valuable source, especially when one understands that successful grants writing begins with good writing of a particular sort. Contents: writing the introduction (an excellent discussion), writing the literature review, writing about methods and the research design, writing up the results and an explanation/discussion of the results, writing an effective conclusion. Loaded with examples and discussions of common problems/pitfalls. Supplemented by material on the basics of good writing and on citing references, as well as a list of links to useful sites for writers (e.g., Strunk and White, the cliché finder, MLA style sheet).

    Jennie Cabrera, Linda Paul, and Mary Alice Rice (American Academy of Pediatricians)
    “A Pediatrician’s Guide to Proposal Writing”
    Generally useful, despite narrow title. Covers getting started, identifying prospects, developing a proposal, why proposals are declined, and managing the grant. Includes two sample proposals.

     

    Gary A. Carnow
    “The Scholastic.com Grant Seminar”
    While pitched to high school teachers, a very well-designed set of lessons with plenty of thoughtful examples and even homework questions. Units: Getting Started, Developing Need Statements, Developing Project Activities, The Grant Budget, Evaluating Your Proposal, Putting It All Together, Sample Grant Proposal.

    George Washington University (Office of the Chief Research Officer)
    "OCRO Handbook for Sponsored Programs"
    190+ pages. A complete, database guide. Very nice budget preparation and
    funding search checklists.

     

     Center for Nonprofit Management
    “Grant Seeker’s Handbook”
    Covers the whole world of nonprofits. Not a guide to writing a proposal. Most valuable on researching the funders, locating databases and other sources of information, types of foundations. Concludes with a lengthy bibliography of print and online resources.

    Central Michigan University
    “Grant SAT: Grant Proposal Self Assessment Tool”
    A comprehensive instrument for assessing the general style and content, the cover letter and executive summary, problem statement/objectives, qualifications of personnel, methods, budget, evaluation, conclusion, and attachments. 19 pp.

    Central Michigan University (Office of Research & Sponsored Programs)
    “Proposal Writer’s Handbook”
    Major chapters on getting started, writing the proposal, submitting the proposal, the review process, and managing the award, as well as a budget development worksheet. 51 pp.

    Cornell University
    “Guide to Proposal Preparation and Submission”
    A complete guide.
     

    Georgia Perimeter College
    “Proposal Writing: Stages and Strategies with Examples”
    Particularly strong on writing tips, editing, selecting a title, preparing the abstract, aesthetics, and reasons for rejection.

    Merete F. Gerli (Congressional Research Service)
    “How to Develop and Write a Grant Proposal”
    A manual on writing an effective grant proposal. 15 pp.

    GrantProposal.com
    “Aesthetics and Technicalities for Grantswriters”
    A host of resources and advice: four factors for success, five steps in grantsmanship, writing inquiry letters and full proposals, researching funders, advice from funders, writing and budgeting tips, and more.

    Lucent Technologies
    “In Search of Technology Treasures: An Online Grant-Writing Seminar”
    A nice guide. Targeted at K-12 educators, but helpful for others to read. Includes: eight preparatory steps, some online funding sites, thirteen writing tips, stilted language to avoid and what to substitute, components of a strong proposal. Also includes excellent checklists so one can self-evaluate each component (abstract, introduction, problem statement, objectives, methods/activities, management plan, evaluation plan, sustainability plan, budget). 30 pp.


     John O’del (Rhode Island College)
    “Grants and Grant-Proposal Writing”
    A complete manual. Lots of references and sources of information at the end.
    35+ pp.

    Ontario Health Communities Coalition
    “Strategies for Effective Proposal Writing”
    Chapters: Introduction, Laying the Groundwork, How’s the Fit?, Putting Pen to Paper, “Packaging” Your Proposal, Proposal Appraisal, Post-Submission Thoughts. 23 pp.

    Purdue University
    “EPA Grant-Writing Tutorial”
    A nice general guide. For each component of a grant proposal, there are tips, a mock grant-writing activity, and an example.

    Eric Rinehart and Barbara Bouie-Scott (Illinois Department of Commerce and Economic Opportunity)
    “Proposal Writing: The Basic Steps in Planning and Writing a Successful Grant Application”
    A basic manual for nonprofits with particular attention to questions one should consider at the start, collecting empirical data, strategizing, selecting and approaching funders, framing the objectives, evaluating the outcomes, budgeting.
    70 pp. (half instructions and half a directory of resources)

    Rochester Institute of Technology
    Electronic Submission
    Mostly a discussion of NSF FastLane.
    A valuable section entitled “Instructions They Do Not Mention.”

     
    SchoolGrants.org
    “Grant Writing Tips”
    A site that has collected tips of proven value to K-12 educators.

    Janet Shapiro (Civicus)
    “Writing a Funding Proposal”
    Covers: basic principles, what to do before writing, advantages and disadvantages of different funding sources, researching and contacting the donor, planning the project, general vs. specific objectives, the proposal by sections, do’s and don’ts, writing and layout tips, follow-up, sample of a proposal. 39 pp.

    Sinclair Community College
    “Proposal Development Tool Kit”
    Sections on Researching Funding Sources, Defining Project Needs, Creating Goals/Objectives/Activities, Identifying Project Resources, Creating the Management Plan, Designing the Evaluation Plan, Sustaining and Institutionalizing Your Project. Best when giving examples of ways to document the need for the project, discussing evaluation and data collection methods, and documenting sustainability. 21 pp.

    S.W.A.T. (Social Work Action Team)
    “Designing a Successful Funding Proposal”
    A nicely-organized guide with lots of good advice. Discusses the “rules” (e.g., be brief, enthusiastic, clear), the letter of intent/inquiry, parts of the proposal (summary, qualifications of the organization, problem statement, different kinds of objectives, methodology, evaluation, budget, conclusion, appendices). 20 pp.

    Texas State Grants Team
    “Writing to Win: Proposal Development Seminar”
    A complete guide that is well done. Lengthy sections on program planning and development, idetifying appropriate funding and tracking grants, and writing the proposal. Also a funding glossary and practice exercises/activities. Good introduction to some major funding sites (Catalog of Federal Domestic Assisrance, grants.gov, fedbizopps.gov for procurement, GrantsNet for HHS, Foundation Center’s Directory). 124 pp.

    Ruth Wahtera
    “79 Grant Writing Resources You Can’t Live Without”
    It’s a blog. It does not have 79 resources listed as yet – that’s the ultimate goal. But there are over 50 so far. Some really interesting stuff. For instance, learn about mapping data on the status of children through SMART (The Socioeconomic Mapping and Resource Topography System), tips on proofreading, using readability statistics, and sites for getting data on public schools.

     

     Information Sources/Finding Data

     Alan Liu (University of California-Santa Barbara)
    “Voice of the Shuttle”
    A giant labor of love, outlining general humanities resources.
    Major categories include: humanities metapages and portals, major web sites, texts,
    humanities centers and programs, journals, guides to critical thinking,
    guides to evaluating internet resources, more. Searchable. Browse by disciplines in the humanities.

    American Association for the Advancement of Science
    “EurekAlert!”
    For the science newshound. A wonderful collection of very recent news releases and articles on scientific topics (broadly defined). Subjects: agriculture, archaeology, atmospheric science, biology, business & economics, chemistry & physics, earth science, education, mathematics, medicine & health, policy & ethics, social & behavior, space & planetary, technology & engineering. Also press releases on science business, grants/awards/books, meetings and great portals to news for kids, marine science, bioinformatics, disease in the developing world, nanotechnology, plus a few articles and releases in other languages. Get this: through this site, you can arrange to receive any of 19 different customized RSS feeds of news on scientific topics (most are free). Finally, links to close to 100 scientific journals.

    The  Association of College & Research Libraries
    “Index to ACRL Section Resources”
    The Association of College & Research Libraries collects resources on 16 topics: African American/Black Studies; Anthropology and Sociology; Asian, African, and Middle Eastern Studies; Collection Development; College Libraries; Continuing Education; English and American Literature; Instruction/Information Literacy; Mentoring; Rare Books and Manuscripts; Recruitment; Science and Technology; Social Sciences; Statistics; Tutorials; Western European Studies; Women and Gender Studies.

    Margaret Vail Anderson
    “Digital Librarian: A Librarian’s Choice of the Best of the Web”
    Massive and impressive lists on close to 90 topics.

    Baruch College
    "NYdata"
    A very good collection of New York City data. Categories include: Population and Geography; Business Activity and Headquarters; Labor Force, Employment and Unemployment; Income and Wages; Consumer Prices; Fiscal Data; International Banking; International Trade; Public Safety and Amenities; Housing; Travel; Education; Culture; Sports; Social Insurance and Welfare; Health and Health Services.
    Best of History WebSites
    A rich portal for histoy teachers and students, this site links to 1,200 sites covering the following categories: prehistory, ancient/biblical history, medieval history, American history, early modern Europe, modern history, WWI history, history today, art history, oral history, general resources, and maps. Additional links to lesson plans/activities, games & animations, and research. Uses a 5-star rating system. Also, a link to The Center for Teaching History with technology.

     Education Commission of the States
    “Community/Technical Colleges: Selected Research & Readings”
    A variety of studies (some new and some older). Topics include: developmental education, workforce development, teacher preparation, trends in student achievement, trends in enrollment/prices/student aid/debt levels, Achieving the Dream, student engagement, probationary students, using data to promote student success.
     

     FedStats (Federal Agencies with Statistical Programs)
    A dynamite source. A real treasure trove. An A-to-Z list of 100 different federal agencies. For each agency, there is a brief paragraph about the research and data collection that it does, along with “contact information” and (for most) a link to “key statistics.” For example, the first agency on the list is described thusly:

     Administration for Children and Families in the Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) collects information for the evaluation of its programs for children and youth, such as Head Start, Temporary Assistance for Needy Families, child support enforcement, adoption assistance, foster care, child care, and child abuse programs.

     findaschool.org
    “General Education v3.0”
    A master list, with links, to colleges around the world. Organized alphabetically by country. A separate list of international language schools.

    The George Washington University HRALTH Resource Center
    “Links: Research and Statistics”
    A major clearinghouse site on postsecondary education for individuals with disabilities, with links to other major sites and statistical sources. The Links are found under “Resources.”

    Handsnet
    “Human Services News”
    Headlines and information on human service needs and programs. Categories: Children and Youth, Civic Engagement, Community Development, Economic Security, Education, Health, Homelessness, Hunger & Nutrition, Substance Abuse.

    Heriot-Watt University of Edinburgh, Scotland
    “Pinakes: A Subject Launchpad”
    A British guide to a multitude of very useful subject portals on the internet (50 single subject portals and 10 multi-subject portals). Includes portals devoted to most academic disciplines (e.g., the arts, biology, business, chemistry, mathematics, education, geography, history, language, law, physics, psychology, science, social sciences), plus a variety of less standard areas (e.g., aerospace and defense studies, conflict studies, refugees, maritime studies, reproductive health, urban design).

    Infomine (Scholarly Internet Resource Collections)

    Searchable database of informative internet sites maintained by the University of California, Riverside. Categories: biological, agricultural & medical sciences; business & economics; cultural diversity; eJournals; government information; maps & GIS; physical sciences, engineering, computer science, and mathematics; social sciences & humanities; visual & performing arts. Search in fields (author, subject, description, title, keyword, full text) and by resource type (e.g., data sets, article databases, abstracts & indexes).

    Internet Public Library
    An enormous, searchable collection of internet resources maintained by the University of Michigan. Subjects: arts & humanities, business, computers, education, entertainment, health, law & government, regional, science & tech, social sciences.

     

    LaGuardia Library Media Resource Center
    “Statistical Sources on the Web”
    LaGuardia Library’s excellent link to 18 sites offering useful statistics in the following categories: General Sources, International, United States, New York State, New York City.

    National Science Foundation
    “Online Evaluation Resource Library”
    A wealth of materials on evaluation, including 100 examples of evaluation plans and 150 examples of data collection instruments. Excellent modules provide lessons on evaluation, questionnaires, interviews, and data collection – with step-by-step instructions, scenarios, and case studies.

    National Technical Information Service (U.S. Department of Commerce)
    “NTIS Database”
    Search engine to locate mountains of scientific and technical publications from
    government agencies (3 million publications and 350 subject-areas). Includes scientific, technical, engineering, and business information. 93-page search guide available online to assist.

    NEH, Council of the Great Schools, Marco Polo Foundation, National Trust for the Humanities
    “EDSITEment”
    Billed as “The Best of the Humanities on the Web” and linked websites and excellent lesson plans for K-12. Subject catalogue organized around four general headings: art & culture, literature & language arts, foreign language, history & social studies.

    New York City Department of City Planning
    "The Newest New Yorkers: Immigrant New York in the New Millennium"
    While not the full volume drawn from 2000 census data, this website is enormously informative, providing: the overview and introduction for the full report, the executive summary, a briefing booklet (44 pages with New York City statistics on country of birth; top immigrant groups; immigration law; foreign birth by borough; settlement patterns by borough, with special attention to Dominicans, Chinese, and Jamaicans; demographic profiles; socioeconomic characteristics; labor force; and housing types).

    New York City Department of City Planning
    "Reference"
    A wealth of interactive features. Includes an address translator (to view addresses within political districts, zip codes, police precincts, etc.), census factfinder (to create customized profiles of areas), district profiles (for community districts), land use facts (with maps), journey-to-work data, neighborhood maps, demographic and enrollment trends in NYC public schools, highlights of the annual report on social indicators (e.g., population, economy, crime, health, education, poverty, housing, and the environment), population/census data, and more.

    Science.gov
    Searchable database encompassing 47 million webpages of governmental scientific and technical information. Alternately, explore a large array of scientific websites by topic or subtopic. Topics: agriculture & food; applied science & technologies; astronomy & space; biology & nature; computers & communication; earth & ocean sciences; energy & energy conservation; environment & environmental quality; health & medicine; math, physics, & chemistry; natural resources & conservation; science education.

    Statistical Office of the European Communities
    “Eurostat”
    A comprehensive site for statistical information about Europe. The site is organized around themes: general and regional statistics; economics and finance; population and social conditions; industry, trade and services; agriculture, forestry and fisheries; external trade; transport; environment and energy; science and technology. For each theme, there are tabs (new, tables, data, methodology, publications). Browse or search it all, including the latest Eurostat Yearbook. A link to each country’s national statistical institute.

    St. Ambrose University (O’Keefe Library)
    “Best Information on the Net”
    Another rich and extensive mega-site for information. Provides web resources alphabetically or by majors (a list of 39 topics). Very nice lists of resources for students, resources for faculty, online reference resources, resources on current events, resources for librarians, and resources regarding disabilities.

    Strathclyde University Centre for Digital Literature Research
    “BUBL Information Service”
    An encyclopedic catalog of internet resources. Searchable alphabetically through extensive subject menus and a list of resource types (e.g., bibliographies, essays, collections of images and sounds, poems, biographies). Also organized in broad Dewey Decimal categories (generalities, philosophy & psychology, religion, social sciences, language, science & mathematics, technology, literature & rhetoric, geography & history).

    University of Buffalo Libraries
    “UB Librarian-Created Subject Guides”
    Dozens of topics. Websites and print materials. Organized alphabetically by subject.

    University of Michigan Digital Library Production Service
    “OAIster: Open Archives Initiative”
    The product of an amazing project that makes digital resources available and searchable from more than 500 academic archives worldwide. Lots that is esoteric and lots that is interesting and found nowhere else.

    University of Michigan Library Documents Center
    "Statistical Resources on the Web"
    A magnificent achievement. A place to begin one's search for any statistical information. Major categories: Agriculture, Business and Industry, Comprehensive Subjects, Consumers, Cost of Living, Demographics, Economics, Education, Energy, Environment, Finance and Currency, Foreign Economics, Foreign Governments, Foreign Trade, Government Finances, Health, Housing, Labor, Military, Politics, Science, Sociology (includes Children, Crime, Elderly, Immigration, Refugees), Transportation, Weather. If one does not like broad categories, there is also a side A-to-Z index with approximately 230 more specific categories.

    University of Michigan Library
    "Census Toolkit: U.S. Census 2000"
    Overwhelmed or stumped in your search for census information? This toolkit is designed to help. Table of Contents: Choosing a Data Source, Data Product Descriptions, Geography and Maps, Working with Census Data and Maps, General 2000 Information, Historical Census Data, Getting Help.

    University of Virginia
    “The Religious Movements Homepage Project”
    An alphabetical listing of group profiles. Also organized by faith traditions. Links to websites and bibliographies of print sources. Searchable. Includes a glossary and special sections on religious freedom and religious broadcasting. A project of Professor Jeffrey K. Hadden’s classes.

    U.S. Census Bureau
    “American FactFinder”
    The ultimate source with information on: the American people, housing, business and government. Draws from various data sets (e.g., Population Estimates of the U.S., Annual Survey of Manufacturers, Statistical Abstract of the United States, American Community Survey, Economic Census. Also links to a reference shelf of useful reports and publications, reference maps and map resources, and tools (such as data extraction tools and international information).

    The Pennsylvania State University Libraries
    “Maps Library”
    Need a map? Links to ten sites that can provide a map.

    Tile.net
    “The Comprehensive Internet Reference”
    Looking for an email newsletter, ezine, or usenet newsgroup? Here’s the place to find them. Type in a topic or search alphabetically.

     

     The WWW Virtual Library: International Affairs Resources
    “International Development ”
    An immense collection of portals, web directories, and indices.

     

    The Association of College & Research Libraries
    “Index to ACRL Section Resources”
    The Association of College & Research Libraries collects resources on 16 topics: African American/Black Studies; Anthropology and Sociology; Asian, African, and Middle Eastern Studies; Collection Development; College Libraries; Continuing Education; English and American Literature; Instruction/Information Literacy; Mentoring; Rare Books and Manuscripts; Recruitment; Science and Technology; Social Sciences; Statistics; Tutorials; Western European Studies; Women and Gender Studies.

    Education Commission of the States
    “Community/Technical Colleges: Selected Research & Readings”
    A variety of studies (some new and some older). Topics include: developmental education, workforce development, teacher preparation, trends in student achievement, trends in enrollment/prices/student aid/debt levels, Achieving the Dream, student engagement, probationary students, using data to promote student success.

    Infomine
    Scholarly Internet Resource Collection

    LaGuardia Library Media Resource Center
    “Resource Guides by Topic”
    Topics include: electronic research, biographical resources, career resources, census data, general reference sites, government publications, higher education, legal and paralegal research, New York City neighborhood demographics, nursing resources, religious diversity, statistical resources, mobile research tools.
    http://library.laguardia.edu/webguide

    LaGuardia Library Media Resource Center
    “Statistical Sources on the Web”

    Statistical Office of the European Communities
    “Eurostat”

    The George Washington University HEATH Resource Center
    “Research and Statistics”
    A major clearinghouse site on post-secondary education for individuals with disabilities, with links to other major sites and statistical sources. The Links are found under “Resources.”

    The Pennsylvania State University Libraries
    “Map Library”

     

     Sample Proposals

     

     4grants.net
    “Sample Proposals”
    The City of Halsey proposes to build a community center and Truckee Meadows Community College seeks a small grant to promote an internet course.

    American Political Science Association
    “Sample Proposals”
    Three proposals from the APSA Small Research Grant Program.

    Mary Bennett (Indiana State University)
    “Example Proposal: Use of Complementary/Alternative Medicine in Breast Cancer Patients”
    A sample proposal.
     

    Grant Space (A Service of the Foundation Center)
    Sample Documents
    Links to three cover letters, two letters of inquiry, two letter proposals, three proposed budgets, and twenty-five grant proposals

    Bergen Community College
    “Samples of Funded BCC Grants”
    Seven successful grants. Funders include the Henry H. Kessler Foundation, NSF, NJ Commission on Higher Education, the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, and the Bildner Family Foundation.

    Jennie Cabrera, Linda Paul, and Mary Alice Rice (American Academy of Pediatricians)
    “A Pediatrician’s Guide to Proposal Writing”
    Generally useful, despite narrow title. Includes two sample proposals.

    Gary A. Carnow
    “The Scholastic.com Grant Seminar”
    While pitched to high school teachers, a very well-designed set of lessons. Sample grant proposal.

    CUNY Council of Grant Officers
    “Model Grant Proposal”
    A model RFP and a proposal responding to the RFP. Includes the review criteria and score sheet for evaluating the application.

    Dominion
    “Sample Proposals”
    Two sample proposals for small grants from Dominion, an energy company, to promote science study in elementary schools.

    The Foundation Center
    “TGCI Library of Winning Grant Proposals”
    Hundreds of proposals, organized by topic. But, beyond very good abstracts, it costs to get them: $99 for a CD with 10-15 proposals in a certain topic area or $29 for a particular proposal.

    GrantProposal.com
    “Sample Proposal: Anger Management”
    A sample proposal on anger management.

    Grantservices.com
    “Proposal Samples”
    Three samples from the Jewish Theological Seminary: a request for a $1 million challenge grant from the Kresge Foundation for a building restoration project; a proposal to fund the creation of an Institutional Research Office; a letter proposal to fund a safety training program for home health workers.

    Grants West (Coloradogrants.org)
    “Sample Proposals”
    A federal proposal (Lightsville Public Schools) and three foundation proposals (Centerville Community Center, St. Francis Homeless Shelter Health Proposal, St. Francis Homeless Shelter Employment Proposal).

    The Idea Bank
    “Online Fire Services Course: Sample Proposals”
    A large collection of fire services grants.

    Institute of Museum and Library Services (IMLS)
    “Sample Applications”
    More than 45 examples from their own competitions. Written for the 2005 IMLS
    Conservation Project: Living Collections (5) and Non-Living Collections (10); Laura Bush 21st Century Librarian Program (5); Museum Projects for Sustaining Cultural Heritage (8), Supporting Lifelong Learning (8), and Serving as Centers of Community Engagement (5); Advancing Learning Communities (1); Building Digital Resources (2); Research and Demonstration (2).

    Deborah Kluge
    “Sample Grant Proposals”
    A list of sites where one finds more than 20 sample proposals.

    Kurzweil Educational Systems
    “Sample Grant Proposal”
    Includes sample cover letter and a sample letter directed toward a foundation. Proposes to buy equipment for a reading intervention program targeting 50 at-risk middle school students.

    S. Joseph Levine (Michigan State University)
    “A Simulated Proposal for a Community-Based Mothers and Infants Center”
    A complete proposal to examine.

    National Center for Supercomputing Applications
    “Samples of Well-Written Proposals”
    21 proposals from astronomical sciences, atmospheric sciences, biological sciences, chemistry, engineering, materials research, ocean sciences, and physics.

    New Jersey State University (Office of Grants and Sponsored Programs)
    “Proposal Writing Tips, Hints and Rules”
    A discussion of the elements of a proposal links to examples of a problem statement, goals and objectives, activities/methodology, a very elaborate evaluation plan, and a budget narrative.

    Wendy Norris (Berea Children’s Home and Family Services)
    “Advancing New Technologies to Promote High Quality Care for Ohio Children and Families”
    Presents executive summary, needs assessment, project description, agency capacity, budget narrative, organizational history, and conclusion. Missing appendices, including budget.

    Non-Profit Guides
    “Sample Proposals”
    Two sample RFPs and proposals.

    Northwest Territories Literacy Council
    “Tools for Community Building Workbook”
    A full workbook that includes three sample proposals for literacy projects (beginning on p. 135), along with a sample cover letter and letter of support

    NSF/NIAID (National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases)
    “Annotated R01 Grant Application and Summary Statement”
    A complete application, annotated to highlight important reminders and requirements. The Summary Statement contains the critiques of the reviewers.

    Frank Odasz (Lone Eagle Consulting)
    “Alaskan Native Youth Cultural Community Building”
    A $400,000 project to teach internet skills in order to effect community empowerment.

    Frank Odasz (Lone Eagle Consulting)
    “Realizing Cultural and Community Sustainability through Internet Innovations in Alaskan Native Villages”
    A sample proposal, with links at the end to eight other model grants written for Alaskan and Texan communities.

    Frank Odasz (Lone Eagle Consulting)
    “Youth Resources Webtour”
    Essentially a series of links, including three to 2004 Lone Eagle Ecommerce Entrepreneurship Grants. Additionally, one of the ecommerce grants (i.e., Awareness Mentoring Integrating Group Outcomes) links to another grant (Montana Choice Project).

    Ernest Partridge (University of California-Riverside)
    “Implications of Disequilibrium Ecology for Environmental Ethics and Policy”
    Sample of a successful NSF proposal.

    Plugged In
    “A Sample Grant Proposal”
    Seeks $25,000 for an after-school computer education program. Includes brief cover letter.

    Janet Shapiro (Civicus)
    “Writing a Funding Proposal”
    A guide that includes a sample proposal to a foundation for a program that would support AIDS orphans.

    Sera Learning
    “Funding: Templates”
    Templates for a proposed anger management course and for a proposed course in negotiating skills, both for young people. Also, cover letters and a budget.

    SchoolGrants.org
    “Index to Sample Proposals”
    Dozens of successful proposals written for K-12 programs.

    Small Business and Technology Development Center
    “Sample Proposals”
    Three very technical proposals: “USDA – Membrane-Based Process for debittering Citrus Juice,” “NASA – Miniature Solid State Sensors for Chemical Contaminants in Liquids,” “Superadherent Hard Coatings by Ion Beam Enhanced Deposition.”

    South Dakota Small Business Innovation Research (Small Business High Technology Institute)
    “Sample Successful Proposals”
    Hard-core technology proposals for DOD, NASA, NSF, and USDA.
    U.S. Department of Education

    “Sample Proposals from the U.S. Department of Education Center for Faith-Based and Community Initiatives”
    Six previously-funded full proposals: a proposal to become a Supplemental Educational Services provider, a proposal to the Carol M. White Physical Education Program, a proposal to the Safe and Drug Free Schools Mentoring Program, a proposal to the Migrant Education High School Equivalency Program, a proposal to the Migrant Education Even Start Program, and a proposal to the Community Technology Centers Program.

    University of Texas-El Paso
    “Sociocultural Beliefs among Latinos with Diabetes”
    A 2005 NIH proposal, annotated with comments on the proposal’s most and least successful aspects.

    University of Texas-El Paso
    “IGERT: Integrative Approaches to Bilingual Cognition and Interaction”
    A 2005 NSF proposal, annotated with comments on the proposal’s most and least successful aspects.

    University of Nevada – Las Vegas
    “Sample Proposal”
    A scientific proposal entitled “Investigation of Hydrogen Effects in Candidate Alloys for Spallation-Neutron-Source Applications.”

    U.S. Department of Education
    “Freedom of Information Act e-Reading Room”
    A significant site. A long list of grant applications to view.
    Most useful for colleges: Strengthening Institutions Grants (10 samples)
    and Predoctoral Interdisciplinary Research Training Grants (5 samples).
    Also: Elementary and Secondary School Counseling Program (1 sample),
    Math and Science Grants (5), Mentoring Program (3),
    Teacher Quality Grants (1), Carol M. White Physical Education Program
    (1), Safe Schools/Healthy Students (3), Smaller Learning Communities (3).

     Specific Topic: Budgeting

    University of New Hampshire (Office of Sponsored Research)
    “Procedures for Estimating Costs and Developing and Reviewing Sponsored Programs Proposal Budgets”
    A good explanatory piece. Covers definitions, direct costs, cost sharing, program income, unallowable direct costs, and F & A costs.
     

    Clarkson University
    “Budget Preparation Guide”
    A good selection of budget FAQs, followed by a guide to constructing a budget (direct and indirect costs, cost sharing/matching funds, budget narrative).

    Columbia University (Office of Projects and Grants)
    “Proposals for Sponsored Projects: An Information Guide for Prospective Project Directors” See p. 30 for a sample proposal budget (summary and detailed).

    The Foundation Center
    “Proposal Budgeting Basics”
    A tutorial on budgeting. Includes advice, ideas, and some sample budgets.

    Foundation Center
    “990 Finder”
    Searchable database for IRS 990 forms filed by funders, with helpful links to a diagram of the 990 form (filed by non-profit organizations exempt from income tax), a diagram of the 990-PF form (filed by private foundations), an excellent online tutorial produced by the Nonprofit Coordinating Committee of New York entitled “How to Read the IRS Form 990 & Find Out What It Means,” and an online tutorial entitled “Demystifying the 990-PF.”

    Georgia Tech Office of Sponsored Programs
    “Agency (Form) Budget”
    An example of a budget submitted on a government form (in this case, the U.S. Department of Energy budget form). Some helpful annotations.

    Harold M. Hastings
    “NSF MRI Grant Workshop: PowerPoint Presentation”
    Includes a sample budget.

    Indiana University
    “Budget: One Year with Cost Share”
    “Budget: Two Year”
    Two samples on Excel spreadsheets.

    Glenn Krell (Illinois Institute of Technology)
    “Introduction to Budget Justification Template”
    Some brief thoughts about providing the budget details that build the case for the proposal.

    NIH Center for Scientific Review
    “Insider’s Guide to Peer Review for Applicants”
    Applicable to all review processes, not just those at NIH. What to do and what not to do.

    Sam C. Smith (Research Corporation)
    “Reflections on Grantseeking”
    Nothing groundbreaking, but a concise narrative offering tips and advice.

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency
    “Tips on Writing a Grant Proposal”
    Particularly strong on budgeting (personnel, fringe benefits, consultants and contract services, equipment, supplies, travel, etc.).

    Western Michigan University
    “Common Budget Mistakes: Lessons Learned from a Recent Grant Writing Workshop”
    Makes a good checklist.

    Western Michigan University
    “Unallowable Cost – Reasonableness Doctrine”
    Using OMB regulations, discusses 26 types of expenses that cannot normally be charged to a federal grant.

    The College of William & Mary
    “What Reviewers Look For”
    A one-page summary of important items to consider.

    The College of William & Mary
    “Proposals to Federal Sponsors vs. Proposals to Non-Federal Sponsors”
    A one-page summary of the differences in perspectives and procedures between federal and non-federal funders.

    Worchester Polytechnic Institute
    “Instructions for Building a Budget”
    A nice discussion of the standard elements, along with some tips and an example budget.

     Specific Topic: Sample Budgets

    Clarkson University
    “Sample Budget Narrative Template”
    An example of a budget narrative.

    Georgia Tech Office of Sponsored Programs
    “Example: Standard Budget”
    Includes budget notes/justifications.

    Harvard University
    The Office of Sponsored Programs supplies a sample budget.

    Mississippi Arts Commission
    “Sample Project Budget”

    National Criminal Justice Reference Service

    "Budget Detail Worksheet"  

    “Sample Budget Detail Worksheet”
    A $375,288 project budget.  Shows the math.  Scroll to Appendix A.

    Nova Southeastern University (Office of Grants and Contracts)
    “Sample Budget Worksheet”
    “Sample Budget Justification”
    For a three-year mental health outreach program.

    Stanford University
    “Sample Budget” and Sample Budget Justification
    Just a hypothetical NSF budget and, for a different project, a sample budget justification.

    SUNY New Paltz
    “Sample Budget Worksheet: Example of Line Item Budget”
    A two-year budget.

    University of California-Berkeley
    “Sample NSF Budget”
    Prepared for the Center for Underwater Technology.

    University of California – San Bernardino
    “Sample Budget” xls.File
    A fictional example.

    University of Pittsburgh (Office of Research)
    “Guide to Budgets and Budgeting”
    Not as much as title suggests. Mostly well-done definitions of the key concepts (e.g., direct costs, supplies).

    University of South Alabama
    “Sample Research Budgets”
    Two sample budgets and a sample budget justification.

    University of Washington
    “Sample Research Grant Budget (Cost-Sharing)"
    A one-page budget.

     Specific Topic: Electronic Submissions
    Stamford University
    "FastLane Tutorial"
    A flash movie training module (which works like a PowerPoint slide show
    with no audio) introduces NSF's FastLane.

    University of Buffalo
    “Tips for Using FastLane”
    Covers: activating a password, logging in, preparing a proposal, giving other people access to your proposal, submitting (individually and collaboratively), creating a pdf file, uploadable EXCEL budget templates.
     Specific Topic: Evaluation

    Carter McNamara (Free Management Library)
    “A Basic Guide to Program Evaluation”
    Topics include: basic ingredients, planning program evaluation, major types of program evaluation, overview and selection of methods, analyzing information and reporting results, contents of an evaluation plan, and pitfalls to avoid.
     

    Sally Bond, Sally E. Boyd, Kathleen A. Rapp (Horizon Research, Inc.)
    “Taking Stock: A Practical Guide to Evaluating Your Own Programs”
    A complete manual. Contents: documenting context and need, defining goals and objectives, using quantitative and qualitative data, strategies for data collection, interpreting and reporting your data, sample evaluation reports, glossary. 97 pp.

    Annie E. Casey Foundation
    “Evaluating Comprehensive Community Change”
    A report that wrestles with evaluation issues: the clarification of goals and
    outcomes, concerns about study design and methodology, aspects of data collection and interpretation.

    Catherine Callow-Heusser (Utah State University)
    “Digital Resources for Evaluators”
    An enormous mega-site on evaluation with links to communities of evaluators, education and training programs, relevant agencies and organizations, evaluation companies and consultants, evaluation texts and documents, instruments, data surveys, statistics, software, funding sources, and other mega-sites and reference sites.

    CDC Evaluation Working Group
    “Resources”
    A mother lode on evaluation. Organized in sections: Organizations, Societies,Foundations, Association; Journals and Online Publications; Step-by-Step Manuals; Logic Model Resources; Planning and Performance Improvement Tools; Reports and Publications.

    Clarkson University
    “Evaluation and Assessment”
    An example of a brief evaluation plan.

    Barbara Dorf (U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development)
    “Performance Measurements”
    A PowerPoint presentation. A primer on performance outputs, outcomes, measurement, accountability, and evaluation. Lists classic mistakes when writing outcomes.

    Joy Frechtling (National Science Foundation)
    “The 2002 User-Friendly Handbook for Project Evaluation”A well-organized guide. In addition to material on types of evaluation, steps in doing an evaluation, and both qualitative and quantitative data collection methods, there is an important discussion on strategies for addressing culturally-responsive evaluation. 92 pp.

    Joy Frechtling and Laure Sharp (National Science Foundation)
    “User-Friendly Handbook for Mixed Method Design”
    A guide looking at common qualitative methods and designs for mixed method evaluation. Illustrated throughout by means of a hypothetical project.

    W.K. Kellogg Foundation
    “Evaluation Toolkit: Overview”
    Interactive site covers evaluation approaches, questions, planning, and budgeting. Even a section on how to go about hiring a consultant.

    W.K. Kellogg Foundation
    “W.K. Kellogg Foundation Evaluation Handbook”
    A complete manual on planning, implementing, and utilizing evaluation. Theories and practices. 110 pp.

    Carter McNamara
    A wealth of materials. Topics discussed include: myths about program evaluation,
    planning evaluation, types of evaluation, methods to collect information,
    selecting which methods to use, analyzing information, reporting results,
    contents of an evaluation plan, common pitfalls.


    National Science Foundation
    “Online Evaluation Resource Library”
    A wealth of materials on evaluation, including 100 examples of evaluation plans and 150 examples of data collection instruments. Excellent modules provide lessons on evaluation, questionnaires, interviews, and data collection – with step-by-step instructions, scenarios, and case studies.

    National Institute for Science Education (College Level One Team)
    A very interesting assessment site. Includes a Field-Tested Learning Assessment Guide for Science, Math, Engineering, and Technology Instructors that includes: an Assessment Primer (by Gina Brissenden and Tim Slater) that introduces the basics and Bloom’s Taxonomy of Educational Objectives; a chart for Matching Goals to CATS (that is, matching student learning outcomes to classroom assessment techniques); and, assessment tools sorted by discipline (agriculture, astronomy & physics, biology, chemistry, computer science, engineering, general science, interdisciplinary courses, math) and assessment tools sorted by techniques (attitude survey, concept tests, concept mapping, conceptual diagnostic tests, interviews, mathematical thinking, multiple choice tests, portfolios, scoring rubrics).

    New Jersey State University (Office of Grants and Sponsored Programs)
    “Proposal Writing Tips, Hints and Rules”
    Example of a very complete evaluation plan. 11 pp.

    The Evaluation Center (Western Michigan University)
    Lots and lots to see: dozens of evaluation checklists, a journal, links to major national evaluation projects, glossaries, a searchable directory of national and international evaluators, links to 300+ web resources, publications.

    Murari Suvedi (Michigan State University Department of Agricultural Extension Education)
    “Introduction to Program Evaluation”
    A thorough introduction. Includes five major steps in evaluation, methods of data collection (e.g., case studies, surveys, sampling, reliability and validity).

    United Way
    “Outcomes Measurement Resource Network”
    A collection of a great deal of information.
    Good discussion of the rationale for measuring outcomes. A resource library.

     Specific Topic: Library Resources/ Bibliography
    Baruch College
    “Library Resources: Grant Searching and Proposal Development”
    A handy one-page bibliography.

    College of Staten Island
    “Selected Bibliography of Grants Information”
    A useful bibliography of print sources, including federal, foundations, databases, and “how-to” articles/books.

    Michigan State University
    “Grants and Related Resources”
    An excellent and comprehensive library guide to foundations, grants, grantsmanship, and relevant websites.

    SRA International Resources
    “Resource Guide”
    An extensive guide to printed funding guides, organized by categories.
    Categories: arts/humanities,business/law, education, equipment/building, health,
    international, minorities/women/disadvantaged, sciences,
    student grants/fellowships, all categories, miscellaneous.

    University of Massachusetts (Library)
    “Grants”
    Includes subject directories (a listing of print directories by discipline areas – arts and humanities, libraries/education, community development/health), directories for specific population groups (women, minorities, veterans; aging, disabled, economically disadvantaged; postdoctoral study), directories for international and foreign programs, and foundation directories. Also print sources on grantsmanship and proposal writing.

     Specific Topic: Planning
    Purdue University
    “Purdue Proposal Enhancement Tools”
    A set of seven worksheets designed to get the proposal writer started and organized. Topics include anticipated outcomes, defining the audience, anticipated costs, evaluation methods and measurement.

    Zimmerman Lehman
    “Researching Funding Sources on the Web”
    An article, with links, on where to look for funding. Covers foundations, corporations, government, individual donors, individual businesses.

     Specific Topic: The Review Process

    Bill Somerville
    “When Proposals Fail: A Foundation Executive’s Basic List of What to Do and Not Do When Requesting Funding”
    Looks at the proposal, credibility, budgets, communicating, and after words.

    College of William and Mary (Office of Grants and Research Administration)
    “What Reviewers Look For”
    A one-page statement that provides a nice summary.

    Sharon K. Inouye and David A. Fiellin (Annuls of Internal Medicine)
    “An Evidence – Based Guide to Writing Grant Proposals for Clinical Research”
    Discusses the review process for NIH grants, advises how to impress the reviewers, provides examples of specific aims and hypotheses, and identifies major review issues (i.e., deficiencies) cited by NIH. Also provides an excellent checklist for research-based grantswriters.

    Yosef Mackler (Bar-Ilan University)
    “Persuasive Proposal Writing”
    A list of things to consider as one plans and writes a proposal.

    National Institutes of Health (NIH)
    “Inside the NIH Grant Review Process: A Video on Peer Review at NIH”
    A 39-minute video in which a real NIH review panel considers mock applications. One can also download the documents (i.e., applications, summary statements, program announcements) that the panel is reviewing for a research project grant, career development grant, and a small innovation grant. The video suggests how applicants can improve their chances.

    P2C2 Group, Inc.
    “Proposal Psychology”
    A short essay on techniques for capturing the attention of reviewers.

    Janet S. Raney (University of Washington)
    “After You’ve Written: The Application Review Process”
    A primer on what reviewers think and what they want. Covers what reviewers want to see and don’t want to see, questions reviewers ask, common faults and how to correct them, small things that peeve reviewers. Discussed in the context of an NIH grant, but more broadly applicable.

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